Metronome

related topics
{album, band, music}
{system, computer, user}
{@card@, make, design}
{language, word, form}
{theory, work, human}
{disease, patient, cell}
{school, student, university}
{film, series, show}

A metronome is any device that produces regular, metrical ticks (beats). These ticks represent a fixed, regular aural pulse; some metronomes also include synchronized visual motion (e.g. pendulum-swing). The metronome dates back to the early 19th century. Though the metronome was conceived as a tool for music, some musicians consider it to be a highly controversial tool in this respect (see Criticism of metronome use): there are musicians who reject the metronome altogether.

A metronome is used by some musicians for practice in maintaining a consistent tempo, or rubato around a fixed beat – yet other musicians view this method of practice negatively (see Criticism of metronome use). A metronome can be used by composers, as an approximate way of specifying the tempo[1] – yet some composers and musicians consider these metronome-tempo-marks to have only little value, or to hinder creative musical interpretation: Johannes Brahms has remarked: "I am of the opinion that metronome marks go for nothing. As far as I know, all composers have, as I, retracted their metronome marks in later years."[2]

Contents

Etymology

The word metronome first appeared in English c.1815 [3] and is Greek in origin:

metron = measure, nomos = regulating

History

Galileo Galilei first studied and discovered concepts involving the pendulum in the late 16th and early 17th centuries. In 1696, Etienne Loulié first successfully used an adjustable pendulum in the construction of the first mechanical metronome; however, his design did not produce any sound and did not include an escapement with which to keep the pendulum in motion.[4] In order to get the correct pulse with this kind of visual devices, one need to watch the precise moment where the pendulum is exactly vertical, as the left and right positions are constantly changing due to the decreasing amplitude.

Full article ▸

related documents
True Colors (Cyndi Lauper album)
Escape (Journey album)
Persistence of Time
With The Beatles
Scherzo
Inuit throat singing
All Killer No Filler
Domenico Alberti
C (musical note)
Ninja Tune
Kid Ory
Keyboardist
Rephlex Records
Kilo Ali
Real World Studios
List of rock and roll performers
Funkadelic (album)
Professional Widow
Essential Logic
Geoff Emerick
Alexander's Ragtime Band
Frank Delgado
The Plimsouls
Oops!... I Did It Again
Bass (music)
Clarence Williams (musician)
Saxhorn
Sens Unik
Attack of the Killer B's
Bill Johnson (jazz musician)