Neuromancer

related topics
{film, series, show}
{system, computer, user}
{theory, work, human}
{god, call, give}
{disease, patient, cell}
{war, force, army}
{game, team, player}
{work, book, publish}
{ship, engine, design}
{service, military, aircraft}
{language, word, form}
{math, number, function}
{company, market, business}
{build, building, house}
{area, community, home}
{@card@, make, design}

Neuromancer is a 1984 novel by William Gibson, a seminal work in the cyberpunk genre and winner of the science-fiction "triple crown" — the Nebula Award, the Philip K. Dick Award, and the Hugo Award.[1] It was Gibson's first novel and the beginning of the Sprawl trilogy. The novel tells the story of a washed-up computer hacker hired by a mysterious employer to work on the ultimate hack.

Contents

Background

The themes which Gibson developed in his early short fiction, the Sprawl setting of "Burning Chrome" and the character of Molly Millions from "Johnny Mnemonic" laid the foundations for the novel.[2] John Carpenter's Escape from New York (1981) was an influence on the novel.[3] Gibson was "intrigued by the exchange in one of the opening scenes where the Warden says to Snake: 'You flew the wing-five over Leningrad, didn't you?' It turns out to be just a throwaway line, but for a moment it worked like the best SF, where a casual reference can imply a lot."[1] The novel's street and computer slang dialogue derives from the vocabulary of subcultures, particularly "1969 Toronto dope dealer's slang, or biker talk." Gibson heard the term "flatlining" in a bar twenty years before writing Neuromancer and it stuck with him.[1] Author Robert Stone, a "master of a certain kind of paranoid fiction", was a primary influence on the novel.[1]

Neuromancer was commissioned by Terry Carr for the third series of Ace Science Fiction Specials, which was intended to exclusively feature debut novels. Given a year to complete the work,[4] Gibson undertook the actual writing out of "blind animal terror" at the obligation to write an entire novel  – a feat which he felt he was "four or five years away from".[1] After viewing the first 20 minutes of landmark cyberpunk film Blade Runner (1982) which was released when Gibson had written a third of the novel, he "figured [Neuromancer] was sunk, done for. Everyone would assume I’d copped my visual texture from this astonishingly fine-looking film."[5] He re-wrote the first two-thirds of the book twelve times, feared losing the reader's attention and was convinced that he would be "permanently shamed" following its publication; yet what resulted was a major imaginative leap forward for a first-time novelist.[1] He added the final sentence of the novel, “He never saw Molly again”, at the last minute in a deliberate attempt to prevent himself from ever writing a sequel, but ended up doing precisely that with Count Zero (1986), a character-focused work set in the Sprawl alluded to in its predecessor.[6]

Full article ▸

related documents
Machinima
Screenplay
Rerun
User Friendly
Final Fantasy IV
Howard Stern
Star Trek: Phase II
The Terminator
Oz (TV series)
Beyond Our Ken
The Thing from Another World
A Night at the Opera (film)
Whodunit
Phantom Blot
Denzel Washington
Leonard Rossiter
Screwball comedy film
The Miracle of Morgan's Creek
Candid Camera
Catherine Zeta-Jones
John Candy
Chasing Amy
The Toxic Avenger
Ernst Stavro Blofeld
Marvin the Martian
The Mary Tyler Moore Show
Fozzie Bear
Wayne's World (film)
Hugh Laurie
Charlie Chan