New World Syndrome

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New World Syndrome is a set of noncommunicable diseases brought on by consumption of junk food. Native Americans, the indigenous people of Oceania and perhaps other people of Asiatic origin are susceptible[1]. It is characterized by obesity, heart disease, diabetes and shortened life span, and, of course, by a change from a traditional diet and exercise to a modern diet and a sedentary lifestyle.

Evidence found[who?] through the study of mitochondrial DNA suggests that there are several factors at play. Subjects of maternal descent from the above named indigenous populations have several genetic factors that provide more efficient conversion of some classes of carbohydrates into ATP. There is also indication[weasel words] that cellular responses to injury, muscular efficiency, and other metabolic differences may set the stage for other factors to cause the symptoms of the syndrome.

Increased rates of depression are known[weasel words] to produce higher rates of obesity through decreased physical activity. Coupled with a more efficient metabolism this could be[weasel words] a major cause of NWS symptoms within population groups such as Native Americans in the United States. As with all studies of the genetic underpinnings of anthropologically diverse groups, the individual circumstances may differ from case to case.

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