Nickname

related topics
{language, word, form}
{woman, child, man}
{borough, population, unit_pref}
{film, series, show}
{theory, work, human}
{work, book, publish}
{system, computer, user}
{black, white, people}
{school, student, university}
{rate, high, increase}
{city, large, area}
{style, bgcolor, rowspan}
{@card@, make, design}

A nickname (also spelled "nick name") is a descriptive name given in place of or in addition to the official name of a person, place or thing. It can also be the familiar or truncated form of the proper name,[1] which may sometimes be used simply for convenience (e.g. "Bobby", "Bob", "Rob", or "Bert" for the name Robert). The term hypocoristic is used to refer to a nickname of affection between those in love or with a close emotional bond, compared with a term of endearment. The term diminutive name refers to nicknames that convey smallness, hence something regarded with affection or familiarity (e.g., referring to children,) or contempt.[2] The distinction between the two is often blurred. It is a way to tell someone they are special and that you love them. It is a form of endearment and amusement. As a concept, it is distinct from both pseudonym and stage name, and also from a title (for example, City of Fountains), although there may be overlap in these concepts.

A nickname is sometimes considered desirable, symbolising a form of acceptance, but can often be a form of ridicule.

Contents

Etymology

The compound word ekename, literally meaning "additional name", was attested as late as 1303.[3] This word was derived from the Old English phrase eaca "an increase", related to eacian "to increase".[4] By the fifteenth century, the misdivision of the syllables of the phrase "an ekename" led to its reanalysis as "a nekename".[5] Though the spelling has changed, the pronunciation and meaning of the word have remained relatively stable ever since.

Conventions in various languages

To inform an audience or readership of a person's nickname without actually calling them by their nickname, English nicknames are generally represented in quotes between the bearer's first and last names (e.g., Dwight David "Ike" Eisenhower, Daniel Lamont "Bubba" Franks, etc.). The middle name is generally eliminated (if there is one), especially in speech. Like English, German uses (German-style) quotation marks between the first and last names (e.g., Andreas Nikolaus „Niki“ Lauda). Other languages may use other conventions; for example, Italian writes the nickname after the full name followed by detto 'called' (e.g., Salvatore Schillaci detto Totò), and Slovenian represents nicknames after a dash or hyphen (e.g., Franc Rozman – Stane). The latter may cause confusion because it resembles an English convention sometimes used for married and maiden names.

Full article ▸

related documents
Tocharian languages
Pidgin
O
Kana
Khuzdul
Ogonek
Noun phrase
Cinquain
Ideogram
Gascon language
Text corpus
Partitive case
Liquid consonant
Prakrit
Omotic languages
Cushitic languages
I
Nominative case
False cognate
Palatal consonant
Verlan
Synonym
Nadsat
Affricate consonant
Hieratic
Pangram
Ethnologue
Tuvaluan language
Phrase
White Russia