Noldor

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In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Noldor (meaning those with knowledge) were those of the second clan of the Elves, the Tatyar, who came to Aman. According to legend, the clan was founded by Tata, the second Elf to awake at Cuiviénen, his spouse Tatië and their 54 companions, but it was Finwë, the first Noldor to come to Valinor with Oromë and the other Elven kings Ingwë and Elwë, who became their king, and led most of them to Valinor. They spoke Quenya in Valinor, but the Exiles who returned to Middle-earth used Sindarin, the language of the Sindar - Elves who never took the journey to Valinor but remained in Middle-Earth after the Awakening.

The Noldor were called Golodhrim or Gódhellim by Sindarin-speakers and Goldoi by Teleri of Tol Eressëa; they are also known as Deep Elves. The singular form of the Quenya noun is Noldo and the adjective is Noldorin.[1] They were the Second Clan of the Elves in both order and size, the other clans being the Vanyar and the Teleri. They typically had grey eyes and dark hair (except for those who had Vanyarin blood, most prominently the members of the House of Finarfin).

Contents

History

Noldor in Valinor

The Noldor are accounted the best of the Elves and all the peoples in Middle-earth in lore, warfare and crafts. In Valinor "great became their knowledge and their skill; yet even greater was their thirst for more knowledge, and in many things they soon surpassed their teachers. They were changeful in speech, for they had great love of words, and sought ever to find names more fit for all things they knew or imagined."[2] They were beloved of Aulë the Smith, and were the first to discover and carve gems. On the other hand, the Noldor were also the proudest of the Elves; and, by the words of the Sindar, "they needed room to quarrel in".[3] Their chief dwelling-place was the city of Tirion upon Túna. Among the wisest of the Noldor were Rúmil, creator of the first writing system and author of many epic books of lore. Fëanor, son of Finwë and Míriel, was the greatest of their craftsmen, "mightiest in skill of word and of hand",[2] and creator of the Silmarils.

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