P

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P (play /ˈp/; named pee)[2] is the sixteenth letter of the basic modern Latin alphabet.

Contents

Usage

In English and most other European languages, P is a voiceless bilabial plosive. Both initial and final Ps can be combined with many other discrete consonants in English words. A common example of assimilation is the tendency of prefixes ending in N to assume an M sound before Ps (such as "in" + "pulse" → "impulse" — see also List of Latin words with English derivatives).

A common digraph in English is "ph", which represents the voiceless labiodental fricative /f/, and can be used to transliterate Phi (φ) in loanwords from Greek. In German, the digraph "pf" is common, representing a labial affricate of /pf/.

Arabic speakers are usually unaccustomed to pronouncing /p/; they pronounce it as /b/.

Codes for computing

In Unicode, the capital "P" is codepoint U+0050 and the lower case "p" is U+0070.

The ASCII code for capital "P" is 80 and for lowercase "p" is 112; or in binary 01010000 and 01110000, respectively.

The EBCDIC code for capital "P" is 215 and for lowercase "p" is 151.

The numeric character references in HTML and XML are "P" and "p" for upper and lower case, respectively.

See also

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