Palais Garnier

related topics
{build, building, house}
{church, century, christian}
{city, large, area}
{album, band, music}
{@card@, make, design}
{day, year, event}
{god, call, give}
{style, bgcolor, rowspan}
{water, park, boat}

The Palais Garnier, also known as the Opéra de Paris or Opéra Garnier, but more commonly as the Paris Opéra, is a 2,200-seat opera house on the Place de l'Opéra in Paris, France, which was the primary home of the Paris Opera from 1875 until 1989. A grand landmark designed by Charles Garnier in the Neo-Baroque style, it is regarded as one of the architectural masterpieces of its time.

The building is located in the 9th arrondissement of Paris and is served by the metro station Opéra and bus 21, 22, 27, 29, 42, 53, 66, 68, 81, 95.

Upon its inauguration in 1875, the opera house was officially named the Académie Nationale de Musique - Théâtre de l'Opéra. It retained this title until 1978 when it was re-named the Théâtre National de l'Opéra de Paris. After the opera company chose the Opéra Bastille as their principal theatre upon its completion in 1989, the theatre was re-named as the Palais Garnier, though Académie Nationale de Musique is still sprawled above the columns of its front façade. In spite of the change of names and the Opera company's relocation to the Opéra Bastille, the Palais Garnier is still known by many people as the Paris Opéra, as have all of the many theatres which have served as the principal venues of the Parisian Opera and Ballet since its founding.

Contents

History

The Palais Garnier was designed as part of the great Parisian reconstruction of the Second Empire initiated by Emperor Napoleon III, who chose the Baron Haussmann to supervise the reconstruction. In 1858 the Emperor authorized Haussmann to clear the required 12,000 square metres (1.2 ha) of land on which to build a second theatre for the world renowned Parisian Opera and Ballet companies. The project was put out to open competition in 1861, and was won by the architect Charles Garnier (1825–1898). The foundation stone was laid in 1861, followed by the start of construction in 1862. Legend has it that the Emperor's wife, the Empress Eugénie, asked Garnier during the construction whether the building would be built in the Greek or Roman style, to which he replied: "It is in the Napoleon III style, Madame!"[citation needed]

Full article ▸

related documents
Isleworth
Loddon, Norfolk
Edam, Netherlands
Kettlebaston
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Slane
Hampton Court Palace
Chiswick House
Dom Tower of Utrecht
Hendon
Eleanor cross
Bethnal Green
The Dakota
Colditz Castle
Courtyard
Zundert
Middleham Castle
Astley Hall
Irish round tower
Roche Abbey
Wentworth Woodhouse
Buckfast Abbey
Evans City, Pennsylvania
Kyrenia
Alnwick Castle
Holyrood Abbey
Newgate Prison
Highbury
Malmesbury Abbey
Ekerö Municipality