Periodic table (large version)

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This is a large version of the periodic table and contains the symbol, atomic number, and mean atomic mass value for the natural isotopic composition of each element. The periodic table of the chemical elements is a tabular method of displaying the chemical elements. Although precursors to this table exist, its invention is generally credited to Russian chemist Dmitri Mendeleev in 1869. Mendeleev intended the table to illustrate recurring ("periodic") trends in the properties of the elements. The layout of the table has been refined and extended over time, as new elements have been discovered, and new theoretical models have been developed to explain chemical behavior.[1]

The periodic table is now ubiquitous within the academic discipline of chemistry, providing an extremely useful framework to classify, systematize and compare all the many different forms of chemical behavior. The table has also found wide application in physics, biology, engineering, and industry. The current standard table contains 118 confirmed elements as of 10 March 2010 (2010 -03-10), through element 118.

Contents

Table

Relative atomic mass 

Legend

Element categories in the periodic table

References

Notes

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