Phase diagram

related topics
{math, energy, light}
{acid, form, water}
{math, number, function}
{line, north, south}

A phase diagram in physical chemistry, engineering, mineralogy, and materials science is a type of chart used to show conditions at which thermodynamically distinct phases can occur at equilibrium. In mathematics and physics, "phase diagram" is used with a different meaning: a synonym for a phase space.

Contents

Overview

Common components of a phase diagram are lines of equilibrium or phase boundaries, which refer to lines that mark conditions under which multiple phases can coexist at equilibrium. Phase transitions occur along lines of equilibrium.

Triple points are points on phase diagrams where lines of equilibrium intersect. Triple points mark conditions at which three different phases can coexist. For example, the water phase diagram has a triple point corresponding to the single temperature and pressure at which solid, liquid, and gaseous water can coexist in a stable equilibrium.

The solidus is the temperature below which the substance is stable in the solid state. The liquidus is the temperature above which the substance is stable in a liquid state. There may be a gap between the solidus and liquidus; within the gap, the substance consists of a mixture of crystals and liquid (like a "slurry").[1]

Types of phase diagrams

2D phase diagrams

The simplest phase diagrams are pressure-temperature diagrams of a single simple substance, such as water. The axes correspond to the pressure and temperature. The phase diagram shows, in pressure-temperature space, the lines of equilibrium or phase boundaries between the three phases of solid, liquid, and gas.

The curves on the phase diagram show the points where the free energy (and other derived properties) becomes non-analytic: their derivatives with respect to the coordinates (temperature and pressure in this example) change discontinuously (abruptly). For example, the heat capacity of a container filled with ice will change abruptly as the container is heated past the melting point. The open spaces, where the free energy is analytic, correspond to single phase regions. Single phase regions are separated by lines of non-analytical, where phase transitions occur, which are called phase boundaries.

Full article ▸

related documents
Enthalpy
Crystallography
Paramagnetism
Mole (unit)
X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy
Metallic hydrogen
Joule–Thomson effect
Spectroscopy
Sonoluminescence
Van der Waals radius
Neutron
Space habitat
High-temperature superconductivity
Fusor
Thermal insulation
Crystal structure
Van der Waals force
Ionization
Thermal conductivity
Water vapor
Convection
Maxwell's demon
Solar flare
Betelgeuse
Foucault pendulum
Deferent and epicycle
LIGO
Mechanical work
Coefficient of thermal expansion
Ionization potential