Phencyclidine

related topics
{disease, patient, cell}
{acid, form, water}
{food, make, wine}
{film, series, show}
{company, market, business}
{area, part, region}
{system, computer, user}
{water, park, boat}
{ship, engine, design}

Phencyclidine (a complex clip of the chemical name 1-(1-phenylcyclohexyl)piperidine, commonly initialized as PCP), also known as angel dust and a myriad of other street names, is a recreational, dissociative drug formerly used as an anesthetic agent, exhibiting hallucinogenic and neurotoxic effects.[1] Developed in 1926,[2] it was first patented in 1952 by the Parke-Davis pharmaceutical company and marketed under the brand name Sernyl. In chemical structure, PCP is an arylcyclohexylamine derivative, and, in pharmacology, it is a member of the family of dissociative anesthetics. PCP works primarily as an NMDA receptor antagonist, which blocks the activity of the NMDA receptor and, like most antiglutamatergic hallucinogens, is significantly more dangerous than other categories of hallucinogens.[3][4] Other NMDA receptor antagonists include ketamine, tiletamine, and dextromethorphan. Although the primary psychoactive effects of the drug lasts for a few hours, the total elimination rate from the body typically extends eight days or longer.

Contents

Biochemistry and pharmacology

Biochemical action

In a similar manner, PCP and analogues also inhibit nicotinic acetylcholine receptor channels (nAChR). Some analogues have greater potency at nAChR than at NMDAR. In some brain regions, these effects act synergistically to inhibit excitatory activity.[citation needed] wPCP (and ketamine) also act as potent D2 receptor partial agonists,[5] as well as dopamine reuptake inhibitors.[citation needed]

Full article ▸

related documents
Adrenoleukodystrophy
Idiopathic intracranial hypertension
Lung cancer
Hydrocodone
Kidney
Peripheral nervous system
Adenosine
Polycystic kidney disease
Brain abscess
Nervous system
Bacillus Calmette-Guérin
Dimethyltryptamine
Coma
Insulin pump
Oncology
Flunitrazepam
Prostate
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease
Tears
Paroxetine
Bilateral cingulotomy
Carbamazepine
Radiation therapy
Psychedelic drug
Smallpox vaccine
Canine distemper
Antibody
Pelvic inflammatory disease
Aphasia
Hypothyroidism