Philadelphia

related topics
{city, large, area}
{land, century, early}
{city, population, household}
{school, student, university}
{country, population, people}
{area, community, home}
{government, party, election}
{law, state, case}
{area, part, region}
{utc_offset, utc_offset_dst, timezone}
{game, team, player}
{rate, high, increase}
{black, white, people}
{company, market, business}
{service, military, aircraft}
{film, series, show}
{county, mile, population}
{line, north, south}
{mi², represent, 1st}
{album, band, music}
{borough, population, unit_pref}
{day, year, event}
{group, member, jewish}
{township, household, population}
{style, bgcolor, rowspan}
{village, small, smallsup}

Philadelphia (pronounced /ˌfɪləˈdɛlfiə/) is the largest city in Pennsylvania, sixth-most-populous city in the United States and the fifty-first most populous city in the world.[3]

In 2008, the population of the city proper was estimated to be more than 1.54 million,[4] while the Greater Philadelphia metropolitan area's population of 5.8 million made it the country's fifth largest. The city, which lies about 80 miles (130 km) southwest of New York City,[5] is the nation's fourth-largest urban area by population and its fourth-largest consumer media market, as ranked by the Nielsen Media Research.

It is the county seat of Philadelphia County, with which it is coterminous. Popular nicknames for Philadelphia include Philly and The City of Brotherly Love, from the literal meaning of the city's name in Greek (Greek: Φιλαδέλφεια ([pʰilaˈdelpʰeːa], Modern Greek: [filaˈðelfia]) "brotherly love", compounded from philos (φίλος) "love", and adelphos (ἀδελφός) "brother").

A commercial, educational, and cultural center, Philadelphia was once the second-largest city in the British Empire[6] (after London), and the social and geographical center of the original 13 American colonies. It was a centerpiece of early American history, host to many of the ideas and actions that gave birth to the American Revolution and independence. It was the most populous city of the young United States, although by the first census in 1790, New York City had overtaken it. Philadelphia served as one of the nation's many capitals during the Revolutionary War and after. After the ratification of the U.S. Constitution, the city served as the temporary national capital from 1790 to 1800 while Washington, D.C., was under construction.

Philadelphia is central to African American history; its large black population predates the Great Migration.

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
Glasgow
Frankfurt am Main
Kuala Lumpur
Berlin
Norfolk, Virginia
Omaha, Nebraska
New Orleans, Louisiana
Dresden
San Francisco, California
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
St. Louis, Missouri
Belfast
Edinburgh
Kansas City, Missouri
Johannesburg
Manhattan
Cluj-Napoca
Zagreb
Munich
Nottingham
Sydney
Chicago
London
Bristol
Dublin
Peterborough
Moncton
Dallas, Texas
Shanghai
Nairobi