Plague (disease)

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Plague is one of three epidemic diseases still subject to the International Health Regulations and notifiable to the World Health Organization (such as tuberculosis or typhus).[1] The deadly infectious disease is caused by the enterobacteria Yersinia pestis, named after the French bacteriologist A.J.E. Yersin. Primarily carried by rodents (most notably rats) and spread to humans via fleas, the disease is notorious throughout history, due to the unrivaled scale of death and devastation it brought. Depending on lung infection, or sanitary conditions, plague also can be spread in the air, by direct contact, or by contaminated undercooked food or materials. The symptoms of plague depend on the concentrated areas of infection in each person: such as bubonic plague in lymph nodes, septicemic plague in blood vessels, pneumonic plague in lungs, etc. Medicines can cure plague if detected early. Plague is still endemic in some parts of the world.

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