Potato chip

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Potato chips (known as chips in American, Australian, Canadian, South African and Indian English as well as most European languages; crisps in British and Irish English; and chippies in New Zealand English[citation needed]) are thin slices of potato that are deep fried. Potato chips are commonly served as an appetizer, side dish, or snack. The basic chips are cooked and salted; additional varieties are manufactured using various flavorings and ingredients including seasonings, herbs, spices, cheeses, and artificial additives. Crisps, however, refer to many different types of snack products in the UK and Ireland, some made from potato, but may also be made from corn, maize and tapioca. An example of these kinds of crisps is Monster Munch.[1] Crisps is also used in North America to refer to baked rather than fried potato such as lays and pringles.

Potato chips are a predominant part of the snack food market in English-speaking countries and numerous other Western nations. The global potato chip market generated total revenues of US$16.4 billion in 2005. This accounted for 35.5% of the total savory snacks market in that year (US$46.1 billion).[2]

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History

According to a traditional story, the original potato chip recipe was created in Saratoga Springs, New York on August 24, 1853. Agitated by a patron's repeatedly sending his fried potatoes back complaining that they were too thick and soggy, resort hotel chef, George Crum, decided to slice the potatoes even thinner. Contrary to Crum's expectation, the patron (sometimes identified as Cornelius Vanderbilt) loved the new chips[3] and they soon became a regular item on the lodge's menu under the name "Saratoga Chips".

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