Quinoa

related topics
{food, make, wine}
{specie, animal, plant}
{language, word, form}
{acid, form, water}
{land, century, early}
{album, band, music}
{group, member, jewish}

Quinoa (pronounced /ˈkiːnwɑː/ or /kɨˈnoʊ.ə/, Spanish: quinua, from Quechua: kinwa), a species of goosefoot (Chenopodium), is a grain-like crop grown primarily for its edible seeds. It is a pseudocereal rather than a true cereal, or grain, as it is not a member of the grass family. As a chenopod, quinoa is closely related to species such as beets, spinach, and tumbleweeds. Its leaves are also eaten as a leaf vegetable, much like amaranth, but the commercial availability of quinoa greens is currently limited.

Contents

Overview

Quinoa originated in the Andean region of South America,[1] where it has been an important food for 6,000 years. Its name is the Spanish spelling of the Quechua name. Quinoa is generally undemanding and altitude-hardy, so it can be easily cultivated in the Andes up to about 4,000 meters. Even so, it grows best in well-drained soils and requires a relatively long growing season. In eastern North America, it is susceptible to a leaf miner that may reduce crop success; this leaf miner also affects the common weed and close relative Chenopodium album, but C. album is much more resistant.

Similar Chenopodium species, such as pitseed goosefoot (Chenopodium berlandieri) and fat hen (Chenopodium album), were grown and domesticated in North America as part of the Eastern Agricultural Complex before maize agriculture became popular. Fat hen, which has a widespread distribution in the Northern Hemisphere, produces edible seeds and greens much like quinoa, but in lower quantities.

Full article ▸

related documents
Miso soup
Greek cuisine
Ceviche
Sago
Gin
Bacon
Fish sauce
Marmite
Mastic
Kefir
Sweet corn
Smoking (cooking)
Rioja (wine)
Pineapple
Bock
Pistachio
Dim sum
Sesame
Red bean soup
Cannabis foods
Chestnut
Salad
Draught beer
Bean
Cheddar cheese
Watermelon
Vaccinium vitis-idaea
Breakfast cereal
Greasy spoon
Jelly Belly