Rendering (computer graphics)

related topics
{math, energy, light}
{system, computer, user}
{math, number, function}
{@card@, make, design}
{film, series, show}
{theory, work, human}
{rate, high, increase}

Rendering is the process of generating an image from a model (or models in what collectively could be called a scene file), by means of computer programs. A scene file contains objects in a strictly defined language or data structure; it would contain geometry, viewpoint, texture, lighting, and shading information as a description of the virtual scene. The data contained in the scene file is then passed to a rendering program to be processed and output to a digital image or raster graphics image file. The term "rendering" may be by analogy with an "artist's rendering" of a scene. Though the technical details of rendering methods vary, the general challenges to overcome in producing a 2D image from a 3D representation stored in a scene file are outlined as the graphics pipeline along a rendering device, such as a GPU. A GPU is a purpose-built device able to assist a CPU in performing complex rendering calculations. If a scene is to look relatively realistic and predictable under virtual lighting, the rendering software should solve the rendering equation. The rendering equation doesn't account for all lighting phenomena, but is a general lighting model for computer-generated imagery. 'Rendering' is also used to describe the process of calculating effects in a video editing file to produce final video output.

Rendering is one of the major sub-topics of 3D computer graphics, and in practice always connected to the others. In the graphics pipeline, it is the last major step, giving the final appearance to the models and animation. With the increasing sophistication of computer graphics since the 1970s onward, it has become a more distinct subject.

Rendering has uses in architecture, video games, simulators, movie or TV special effects, and design visualization, each employing a different balance of features and techniques. As a product, a wide variety of renderers are available. Some are integrated into larger modeling and animation packages, some are stand-alone, some are free open-source projects. On the inside, a renderer is a carefully engineered program, based on a selective mixture of disciplines related to: light physics, visual perception, mathematics and software development.

In the case of 3D graphics, rendering may be done slowly, as in pre-rendering, or in real time. Pre-rendering is a computationally intensive process that is typically used for movie creation, while real-time rendering is often done for 3D video games which rely on the use of graphics cards with 3D hardware accelerators.

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
Ray tracing (graphics)
Superconducting magnetic energy storage
Radio telescope
Electrometer
Rayleigh fading
Plasma stability
High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program
Gamma correction
Metrology
Perpetual motion
Statistical ensemble (mathematical physics)
Geomagnetic storm
Potential flow
Radiosity
Passive solar building design
Very Large Telescope
Thermistor
Stellarator
Maxwell–Boltzmann distribution
Fourier transform spectroscopy
Microwave
Attenuation
Olbers' paradox
Quantum teleportation
Solid angle
Power (physics)
Cutoff frequency
Scanning tunneling microscope
Huygens–Fresnel principle
Heinrich Hertz