Roman censor

related topics
{law, state, case}
{son, year, death}
{language, word, form}
{government, party, election}
{church, century, christian}
{household, population, female}
{work, book, publish}
{rate, high, increase}
{city, population, household}
{god, call, give}

This article is part of the series:
Politics and government of
Ancient Rome

Roman Republic
508 BC27 BC
Roman Empire
27 BCAD 1453

Principate
Western Empire

Dominate
Eastern Empire

Constitution of the Kingdom
Constitution of the Republic
Constitution of the Empire
Constitution of the Late Empire
History of the Constitution
Senate
Legislative Assemblies
Executive Magistrates

Consul
Praetor
Quaestor
Promagistrate

Aedile
Tribune
Censor
Governor

Dictator
Magister Equitum
Consular tribune

Rex
Triumviri
Decemviri

Legatus
Dux
Officium
Praefectus
Vicarius
Vigintisexviri
Lictor

Magister militum
Imperator
Princeps senatus
Pontifex Maximus
Augustus
Caesar
Tetrarch

Imperium
Mos maiorum
Collegiality

Roman citizenship
Auctoritas
Cursus honorum

The censor was an officer in ancient Rome who was responsible for maintaining the census, supervising public morality, and overseeing certain aspects of the government's finances.

The censors' regulation of public morality is the origin of the modern meaning of the words "censor" and "censorship."

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
Roberto Calvi
Babylonian law
Search warrant
Mootness
Arrest warrant
Summary offence
Scientology and the legal system
Injunction
United States Code
Good Samaritan law
Internal Revenue Service
International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights
European Court of Human Rights
Twenty-seventh Amendment to the United States Constitution
Harold Shipman
Hanged, drawn and quartered
English law
Laws of war
Gideon v. Wainwright
McDonald's Restaurants v Morris & Steel
Interrogatories
Acceptable use policy
Section Thirty-three of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
New York divorce law
False Claims Act
Crime against humanity
Congressional power of enforcement
Adversarial system
Punishment
Article Six of the United States Constitution