Rumi

related topics
{god, call, give}
{theory, work, human}
{son, year, death}
{country, population, people}
{album, band, music}
{work, book, publish}
{church, century, christian}
{language, word, form}
{day, year, event}
{group, member, jewish}
{line, north, south}
{government, party, election}
{school, student, university}
{film, series, show}

Jalāl ad-Dīn Muḥammad Balkhī (Persian: جلال‌الدین محمد بلخى), also known as Jalāl ad-Dīn Muḥammad Rūmī (Persian: جلال‌الدین محمد رومی), and popularly known as Mowlānā (Persian: مولانا) but known to the English-speaking world simply as Rumi[2] (30 September 1207 – 17 December 1273), was a 13th-century Persian (today's Tajiks)[3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10] muslim poet, jurist, theologian, and Sufi mystic.[11] Rūmī is a descriptive name meaning "the Roman" since he lived most of his life in an area called Rūm because it was once ruled by the Eastern Roman Empire.[12]

It is likely that he was born in the village of Wakhsh,[13] a small town located at the river Wakhsh in what is now Tajikistan. Wakhsh belonged to the larger province of Balkh, and in the year Rumi was born, his father was an appointed scholar there.[13] Both these cities were at the time included in the greater Persian cultural sphere of Khorasan, the easternmost province of Persia,[3] and were part of the Khwarezmian Empire.

His birthplace[3] and native language[14] both indicate a Persian heritage. His father decided to migrate westwards due to quarrels between different dynasties in Khorasan, opposition to the Khwarizmid Shahs who were considered devious by Bahā ud-Dīn Walad (Rumi's father),[15] or fear of the impending Mongol cataclysm.[16] Rumi's family traveled west, first performing the Hajj and eventually settling in the Anatolian city Konya (capital of the Seljuk Sultanate of Rum, in present-day Turkey). This was where he lived most of his life, and here he composed one of the crowning glories of Persian literature which profoundly affected the culture of the area.[17]

Full article ▸

related documents
Four Quartets
Golden age
Aeneid
Martyr
Legend
Sermon on the Mount
The Bacchae
Lugh
Prophecy
Animism
Banquo
Aida
Angra Mainyu
Ma'at
Esther
The Great Divorce
Melampus
Theocritus
Sceaf
Inuit mythology
Dylan Ail Don
Olokun
Heart of Darkness
Asceticism
Semiramis
Hobbit
Book of Mosiah
Justin Martyr
Merlin
Ennead