Rupert Sheldrake

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Rupert Sheldrake (born 28 June 1942) is an English biochemist and plant physiologist. He is known for having proposed an unorthodox account of morphogenesis and for his research into parapsychology. His books and papers stem from his theory of morphic resonance, and cover topics such as animal and plant development and behaviour, memory, telepathy, perception and cognition in general. His publications include A New Science of Life (1981), Seven Experiments That Could Change the World (1995), Dogs That Know When Their Owners Are Coming Home (1999), and The Sense of Being Stared At (2003).

Sheldrake's ideas have often met with a hostile reception from some scientists, including accusations that he is engaged in pseudoscience.[1][2][3]

Contents

Biography

Early life and education

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