Sea lion

related topics
{specie, animal, plant}
{island, water, area}
{water, park, boat}
{war, force, army}
{woman, child, man}
{law, state, case}

Sea lions are pinnipeds characterized by external ear-flaps, long fore-flippers, the ability to walk on all fours, and short thick hair. Together with the fur seals, they comprise the family Otariidae, or eared seals. There are six extant and one extinct species (the Japanese sea lion) in five genera. Their range extends from the subarctic to tropical waters of the global ocean in both the northern and southern hemispheres with the notable exception of the northern Atlantic Ocean.[1]

Contents

Taxonomy

Together with the fur seals, they constitute the Otariidae family, collectively known as eared seals. Until recently, sea lions were grouped under a single subfamily called Otariinae to distinguish them from the fur seals Arcocephalinae, based on the most prominent common feature between all species, namely the lack of the dense underfur characteristic of the latter. Recent genetic evidence, however, strongly suggests that Callorhinus, the genus of the Northern fur seal is more closely related to some sea lion species than to the other fur seal genus Arctocephalus.[2] Therefore the fur seal/sealion subfamily distinction has been eliminated from many taxonomies. Nonetheless, all fur seals have certain features in common: the fur, generally smaller sizes, farther and longer foraging trips, smaller and more abundant prey items and greater sexual dimorphism. And all sea lions have certain features in common, in particular their coarse, short fur, greater bulk and larger prey than fur seals. For these reasons, the distinction remains useful.

Taxonomy

Full article ▸

related documents
Yucca
Bromeliaceae
Tilapia
Himalayan (cat)
Rafflesia
Bos
Sparrow
Acritarch
Priapulida
Loxommatidae
Testudines
Sexual reproduction
Texas longhorn (cattle)
Liliales
Chelicerata
Ungulate
Nightjar
Russian Blue
Marrella
Lemuridae
Quadruped
Eagle ray
Menhaden
Clade
Porcupine
Japanese Bobtail
Charadriiformes
Galago
Timeline of evolution
Larch