Sega Game Gear

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The Sega Game Gear (ゲームギア Gēmu Gia?) was Sega's first handheld game console. It was the third commercially available color handheld console, after the Atari Lynx and the TurboExpress.

Work began on the console in 1989 under the codename "Project Mercury", following Sega's policy at the time of codenaming their systems after planets. The system was released in Japan on October 6, 1990, North America, Europe and Brazil in 1991,[1] and Australia in 1992. The launch price was $150 US and £145 UK.[1] Sega dropped support for the Game Gear in early 1997.

Contents

Features

Design

The Game Gear was a portable version of the Master System with a lower resolution screen, but allowed for a larger color palette. In addition, it could also produce stereo sound (through headphones) as opposed to the Master System's monaural output, though very few games made use of the stereo capabilities. Unlike the original Game Boy, in which the screen was positioned above the buttons, the system was held in a "landscape" position, with the controls at the sides, making it less cramped to hold.

Because of the similarities between the Master System and the Game Gear, it was fairly easy for Master System games to be ported to Game Gear cartridges. Alternately, the Master Gear Converter was released during the system's lifetime which allowed original Master System games to be played on the Game Gear.

Variations

The blue Game Gear edition, identical to the standard Game Gear, except in body color, was released in 1994, with the game The Lion King.

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