Speciation

related topics
{specie, animal, plant}
{theory, work, human}
{area, part, region}
{island, water, area}
{line, north, south}
{country, population, people}
{build, building, house}

Adaptation
Genetic drift
Gene flow
Mutation
Natural selection
Speciation

Introduction
Evidence
Evolutionary history of life
History
Level of support
Modern synthesis
Objections / Controversy
Social effect
Theory and fact

Cladistics
Ecological genetics
Evolutionary anthropology
Evolutionary development
Evolutionary psychology
Molecular evolution
Phylogenetics
Population genetics
Systematics

Speciation is the evolutionary process by which new biological species arise. The biologist Orator F. Cook seems to have been the first to coin the term 'speciation' for the splitting of lineages or 'cladogenesis,' as opposed to 'anagenesis' or 'phyletic evolution' occurring within lineages.[1][2] Whether genetic drift is a minor or major contributor to speciation is the subject matter of much ongoing discussion.

There are four geographic modes of speciation in nature, based on the extent to which speciating populations are geographically isolated from one another: allopatric, peripatric, parapatric, and sympatric. Speciation may also be induced artificially, through animal husbandry or laboratory experiments. Observed examples of each kind of speciation are provided throughout.[3]

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
Coyote
Cheetah
Velociraptor
Peafowl
Feather
Seabird
Thylacine
Sex
Jellyfish
Tuatara
Brown Bear
Labrador Retriever
Catfish
Kakapo
Pinniped
Carnivora
Bipedalism
Cichlid
American Bison
Cloning
Ascomycota
Arecaceae
Endangered species
Hedgehog
Kangaroo
Fox hunting
Domestication
Jaguar
Snail
Red-eared slider