Steller Sea Lion

related topics
{specie, animal, plant}
{island, water, area}
{water, park, boat}
{woman, child, man}
{company, market, business}
{country, population, people}
{line, north, south}
{area, part, region}
{household, population, female}

The Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) also known as the northern sea lion, is a threatened species of sea lion in the northern Pacific. It is the sole member of the genus Eumetopias and the largest of the eared seals (Otariidae). Among pinnipeds, it is inferior in size only to the walrus and the two elephant seals. The species is named for the naturalist Georg Wilhelm Steller who first described them in 1741. The Steller sea lion has attracted considerable attention in recent decades due to significant, unexplained declines in their numbers over a large portion of their range in Alaska.

Contents

Physical description

Adult animals are lighter in color than most sea lions, ranging from pale yellow to tawny and occasionally reddish. Steller sea lion pups are born almost black, weighing around 23 kg (50 lbs), and remain dark for several months. Females and males both grow rapidly until the fifth year, after which female growth slows down considerably, attaining on average 2.5 m (8 feet) in length and 300 kg (660 lbs). Males continue to grow until their secondary sexual traits appear in their fifth to eighth year. Males are slightly longer than the females; they grow to about 3.25 m (10.7 feet) long [2] and have much wider chests, necks and general forebody structure and weigh 600–1100 kg (1300-2500 lbs).[3] Males are further distinguished by broader, higher foreheads, flatter snouts, and darker, slightly tuftier hair around their large necks, giving them a maned appearance. Indeed, their Latin name translates roughly as: "maned one with the broad forehead".

Ecology

The range of the Steller sea lion extends from the Kuril Islands and the Sea of Okhotsk in Russia to the Gulf of Alaska in the north, and down to Año Nuevo Island off central California.[4] They formerly bred as far south as the Channel Islands but have not been observed there since the 1980s. Based on genetic anаlyses and local migration patterns, the global Steller sea lion population has traditionally been divided into an Eastern and Western stock at 144° W longitude, roughly through the middle of the Gulf of Alaska.[5][6] Recent evidence suggests that the sea lions in Russia in the Sea of Okhotsk and the Kuril islands comprise a third Asian stock, while the sea lions on the eastern seaboard of Kamchatka and the Commander Islands belong to the Western stock

Full article ▸

related documents
Hippopotamus
Armadillo
Manta ray
Peccary
Bryozoa
Mussel
Passerine
Pollinator
Polyp
Chondrichthyes
Polyploidy
Python reticulatus
Herbivory
Aye-aye
Triassic
Peppered moth
Pelican
Cuttlefish
Ecological selection
Platypus
List of freshwater aquarium fish species
Marsupial
Hagfish
Human genome
Bagworm moth
Pangolin
Dolphin
Discus (fish)
Carnivore
Monk Parakeet