Stress (biological)

related topics
{disease, patient, cell}
{theory, work, human}
{war, force, army}
{service, military, aircraft}
{black, white, people}
{language, word, form}

Stress is a term in psychology and biology, first coined in the biological context in the 1930s, which has in more recent decades become commonly used in popular parlance. It refers to the consequence of the failure of an organism – human or animal – to respond appropriately to emotional or physical threats, whether actual or imagined.[1]

Signs of stress may be cognitive, emotional, physical or behavioral. Signs include poor judgment, a general negative outlook[citation needed], excessive worrying, moodiness, irritability, agitation, inability to relax, feeling lonely, isolated or depressed, aches and pains, diarrhea or constipation, nausea, dizziness, chest pain, rapid heartbeat, eating too much or not enough, sleeping too much or not enough, social withdrawal, procrastination or neglect of responsibilities, increased alcohol, nicotine or drug consumption, and nervous habits such as pacing about, nail-biting and neck pains.

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
Out-of-body experience
Déjà vu
Hypnosis
Cyborg
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Psychedelic drug
Basal ganglia
Dwarfism
Pseudomembranous colitis
Orthostatic hypotension
Homocysteine
Vancomycin
Hyperthermia
Cataract
Tinnitus
Coronary circulation
Anti-psychiatry
Optic nerve
Hypothyroidism
Health
Bilirubin
Mastocytosis
Paroxetine
Transcendental Meditation
Foreskin
Canine distemper
Adenosine
Arsenic poisoning
Dendritic cell
Breathing