Suttung

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{god, call, give}
{son, year, death}
{island, water, area}
{food, make, wine}

In Norse mythology, Suttungr was a Jötunn, son of Gilling, who (along with Suttungr's mother) had been murdered by Fjalar and Galar.

Suttungr searched for his parents and threatened the dwarven brothers (Fjalar and Galar), tying them and some other dwarves who killed Gilling to a rock that would be submerged by the rising tide. The dwarves begged for Suttungr to spare their life and offered him the magical mead of poetry. Suttungr took it and hid it in the center of a mountain, with his daughter, Gunnlod, standing guard whom he turned into a witch in order to guard it.

Odin eventually decided to obtain the mead. He worked for Baugi, Suttungr's brother, a farmer, for an entire summer, then asked for a small sip of the mead. Baugi drilled into the mountain and Odin changed into a snake and slithered inside. Inside, Gunnlod was on guard but he persuaded her to give him three sips in exchange for three nights of sex. Odin proceeded to drink all the mead, changed into an eagle and escaped. Suttungr chased him.

The Saturnian moon Suttungr was originally spelled Suttung from 2003 to 2005.

The Gotlandic image stone Stora Hammars III is held to depict Odin in his eagle fetch (note the eagle's beard), Gunnlöð holding the mead of poetry, and Suttungr.

Chased by Suttungr, Odin spits the mead of poetry into several vessels. Some of it accidentally goes out the other end. Illustration by Jakob Sigurðsson, an 18th century Icelandic artist.

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