Thallium

related topics
{acid, form, water}
{disease, patient, cell}
{specie, animal, plant}
{food, make, wine}
{black, white, people}
{day, year, event}

Thallium (play /ˈθæliəm/ THAL-ee-əm) is a chemical element with the symbol Tl and atomic number 81. This soft gray poor metal resembles tin but discolors when exposed to air. The two chemists, William Crookes and Claude-Auguste Lamy, discovered thallium independently in 1861 by the newly developed method of flame spectroscopy. Both discovered the new element in residues of the sulfuric acid production.

Approximately 60–70% of thallium production is used in the electronics industry, and the rest is used in the pharmaceutical industry and in glass manufacturing.[2] It is also used in infrared detectors. Thallium is highly toxic and was used in rat poisons and insecticides. Its use has been cut back or eliminated in many countries because of its nonselective toxicity. Because of its use for murder, thallium has gained the nicknames "The Poisoner's Poison" and "Inheritance Powder" (alongside arsenic).[3]

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
Roentgenium
Carbonic acid
Sintering
Biopolymer
Carboxylic acid
Endoplasmic reticulum
Neon
Terbium
Solvation
Natron
Gel
Catalase
Alum
Zirconium
Astatine
Phosphor
Ziegler-Natta catalyst
Phosgene
Lanthanoid
Nucleophile
Organometallic chemistry
Lanthanum
Boiling point
Polymerization
Functional group
Alcohol dehydrogenase
Isopropyl alcohol
Nuclear technology
Cubic zirconia
Southern blot