The Great Exhibition

related topics
{city, large, area}
{church, century, christian}
{day, year, event}
{company, market, business}
{theory, work, human}
{government, party, election}
{black, white, people}
{@card@, make, design}
{son, year, death}

The Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of all Nations or The Great Exhibition, sometimes referred to as the Crystal Palace Exhibition in reference to the temporary structure in which it was held, was an international exhibition that took place in Hyde Park, London, from 1 May to 15 October 1851. It was the first in a series of World's Fair exhibitions of culture and industry that were to become a popular 19th-century feature. The Great Exhibition was organized by Henry Cole and Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, the spouse of the reigning monarch, Victoria. It was attended by numerous notable figures of the time, including Charles Darwin, members of the Orléanist Royal Family and the writers Charlotte Brontë, Lewis Carroll, and George Eliot.

Contents

Background

The Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of all Nations was organized by Prince Albert, Henry Cole, Francis Henry, George Wallis, Charles Dilke and other members of the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce as a celebration of modern industrial technology and design. It can be argued that the Great Exhibition was mounted in response to the highly successful French Industrial Exposition of 1844. Additionally, by hosting this exhibition, "Great Britain made clear to the world its role as industrial leader."[1] Prince Albert, Queen Victoria's consort, was an enthusiastic promoter of a self-financing exhibition; the government was persuaded to form the Royal Commission for the Exhibition of 1851 to establish the viability of hosting such an exhibition. Queen Victoria and her family visited three times. Although the Great Exhibition was a platform on which countries from around the world could display their achievements, Great Britain sought to prove its superiority. The English exhibits at the Great Exhibition "held the lead in almost every field where strength, durability, utility and quality were concerned, whether in iron and steel, machinery or textiles."[2] Great Britain also sought to provide the world with the hope of a better future by hosting this Exhibition. Europe had just struggled through "two difficult decades of political and social upheaval," and now Great Britain hoped to show that technology was the key to a better future.[1]

Full article ▸

related documents
St. Olaves
Crowland
Ashburton, Devon
Troyes
Aelia Capitolina
Hospital de Sant Pau
Varese
Vianen
Olbia
Caesarea Maritima
Besalú
Noordwijk
Wernigerode
Neustrelitz
Acropolis
Cowbridge
Mérida, Spain
Soli, Cyprus
Monte Carlo
Bad Doberan
Sydney Harbour National Park
Fonni
Roosendaal
Lost Gardens of Heligan
Rayne, Essex
Beaulieu, Hampshire
Appingedam
Georgetown, Ascension Island
Heysel Park
Hørning