Towamencin Township, Pennsylvania

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Towamencin Township is a township in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 17,597 at the 2000 census. It is part of the North Penn School District. Towamencin has residential neighborhoods, historic farmhouses, recreational facilities, many schools, and open spaces. The community is a mix of residential, commercial and rural development. The Township is centrally located in the middle of Montgomery County with easy access to the Pennsylvania Turnpike’s Northeast Extension.

Contents

History

Founding

The first settlers, of German, Welsh, and Dutch descent, arrived in Towamencin Township around the turn of the 18th century. They mainly pursued agricultural endeavors to sustain their livelihood.

The first grant of land in Towamencin Township was in 1703 from William Penn's Commissioners to Benjamin Furley on June 8. The Commissioners granted 1,000 acres (4 km²) to him. On June 17 of that same year, Abraham Tennis and Jan Lucken bought the property from him, and then divided the land in half in 1709. The Morgan Log House stands on land that was part of 600 acres (2.4 km²) granted to Griffith Jones by the Commissioners. Edward Morgan purchased 309 acres (1.25 km²) of this land, which included an existing "dwelling house", from Griffith Jones on February 26, 1708. In 1720, his daughter Sarah, who in 1734 would give birth to the famous frontiersman Daniel Boone, married Squire Boone.[1] The land containing the house was then deeded to John Morgan, son of Edward, on August 23, 1723 as part of a 104 acre (.42 km²) tract.[2] In March of 1728 the settlers of the area petitioned William Penn's Commissioners for Towamencin to become a Township. The request was granted and a charter given. The land was surveyed and recorded, outlining the boundaries of the Township, known as antioch. Those boundaries are similar to what they are today. In the enumeration of 1734 there were 32 landholders within the Township, with William Tennis having the most area at 250 acres (1 km²).

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