Trinity Hall, Cambridge

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Trinity Hall

Trinity Hall is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge, England. It is the fifth-oldest college of the university, having been founded in 1350 by William Bateman, Bishop of Norwich.

Contents

Foundation

The devastation caused by the Black Death plague of the 1340s caused the loss of nearly half of the English population; Bishop Bateman himself lost nearly 700 of his parish priests, and so his decision to found a college was probably centred around a need to rebuild the priesthood. Thus in the foundation of 1350, Bateman stated that the college's aim was "the promotion of divine worship and of canon and civil science and direction of the commonwealth and especially of our church and diocese of Norwich." This led the college to be particularly strong in legal studies, a tradition that has continued over the centuries.

Buildings

The college site on the River Cam was originally obtained from the purchase of a house from John de Crauden to house the monks during their study, and the main court was built in the college's first few decades.

The chapel was licensed in 1352 and built in 1366, in the year that Pope Urban V granted the Master and Fellows permission to celebrate Mass in the college. In 1729, Sir Nathaniel Lloyd redecorated the chapel in what, despite subsequent enlargements, remains an intimate style, forming the smallest of the University's chapels. The painting in the chapel is Maso da San Friano's Salutation or Visitation, depicting Mary's visit to Elizabeth, mother of John the Baptist.

Like the chapel, the Hall of the college was rebuilt by Sir Nathaniel Lloyd and enlarged in the 19th century. It also remains one of the smallest and most intimate halls in the University.

The college library was built in the late sixteenth century, probably during the mastership of Thomas Preston and is now principally used for the storage of manuscripts and rare books. The new Jerwood Library overlooking the river was opened by Lord Howe in 1999.

The college also owns properties in the centre of Cambridge, on Bateman Street and Thompson's Lane, and on its Wychfield Site next to Fitzwilliam College.

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