Tuna

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Tuna are salt water fish from the family Scombridae, mostly in the genus Thunnus. Tuna are fast swimmers, and some species are capable of speeds of 70 kilometres per hour (43 mph) or more. Unlike most fish, which have white flesh, the muscle tissue of tuna ranges from pink to dark red. The red coloration derives from myoglobin, an oxygen-binding molecule, which tuna express in quantities far higher than most other fish. Some larger tuna species, such as bluefin tuna, display some warm-blooded adaptations, and can raise their body temperatures above water temperatures by means of muscular activity. This enables them to survive in cooler waters and to inhabit a wider range of ocean environments than other types of fish.

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Etymology

"Tuna" comes from the Spanish word atún, from Arabic تن or تون tun/tūn, from Latin thunnus, from Greek θύννος, thynnos.

Taxonomy

There are over 48 different tuna species. The Thunnus genus includes 9 species:

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