Turing Award

related topics
{math, number, function}
{system, computer, user}
{work, book, publish}
{theory, work, human}
{style, bgcolor, rowspan}
{group, member, jewish}
{woman, child, man}

The Turing Award, in full A.M. Turing Award, is an annual award given by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) to "an individual selected for contributions of a technical nature made to the computing community." The contributions should be of lasting and major technical importance to the computer field".[1] The Turing Award is recognized as the "highest distinction in Computer science"[2] and "Nobel Prize of computing".[3]

The award is named after Alan Mathison Turing, a British scientist, mathematician and Reader in Mathematics at The University of Manchester. Turing is "frequently credited for being the Father of theoretical computer science and artificial intelligence".[4] As of 2007, the award is accompanied by a prize of $250,000, co-sponsored by Intel and Google.[1]

The first recipient, in 1966, was Alan Perlis, of Carnegie Mellon University. Frances E. Allen of IBM, in 2006, was the first female recipient in the award's forty year history.[5][6][7] The 2008 award also went to a woman, Barbara Liskov.

The award recipients and the fields in which they earned the recognition are listed below. Refer to the individual recipients for more detailed information on their achievements.

Turing Award recipients

Notes

External links

Alan Perlis (1966) · Maurice Vincent Wilkes (1967) · Richard Hamming (1968) · Marvin Minsky (1969) · James H. Wilkinson (1970) · John McCarthy (1971) · Edsger W. Dijkstra (1972) · Charles Bachman (1973) · Donald Knuth (1974) · Allen Newell / Herbert Simon (1975) · Michael O. Rabin / Dana Scott (1976) · John Backus (1977) · Robert Floyd (1978) · Kenneth E. Iverson (1979) · C. A. R. Hoare (1980) · Edgar F. Codd (1981) · Stephen Cook (1982) · Ken Thompson / Dennis Ritchie (1983) · Niklaus Wirth (1984) · Richard Karp (1985) · John Hopcroft / Robert Tarjan (1986) · John Cocke (1987) · Ivan Sutherland (1988) · William Kahan (1989) · Fernando J. Corbató (1990) · Robin Milner (1991) · Butler Lampson (1992) · Juris Hartmanis / Richard Stearns (1993) · Edward Feigenbaum / Raj Reddy (1994) · Manuel Blum (1995) · Amir Pnueli (1996) · Douglas Engelbart (1997) · Jim Gray (1998) · Fred Brooks (1999) · Andrew Yao (2000) · Ole-Johan Dahl / Kristen Nygaard (2001) · Ron Rivest / Adi Shamir / Leonard Adleman (2002) · Alan Kay (2003) · Vint Cerf / Bob Kahn (2004) · Peter Naur (2005) · Frances E. Allen (2006) · Edmund M. Clarke / E. Allen Emerson / Joseph Sifakis (2007) · Barbara Liskov (2008) · Charles P. Thacker (2009)

Full article ▸

related documents
Work breakdown structure
Claude Shannon
Alexander Grothendieck
Universal Turing machine
Heuristic
Unified Modeling Language
Google search
Queueing theory
Defensive programming
Enterprise Objects Framework
Maple (software)
ANSI escape code
One instruction set computer
Lotus Improv
Norbert Wiener
Hermann Grassmann
Basic Encoding Rules
COMMAND.COM
HyperTalk
William Rowan Hamilton
Information visualization
XUL
Event-driven programming
Compiler optimization
ACID
Z-buffering
Felix Klein
Actual infinity
Yabasic
Robots exclusion standard