Ursula Southeil

related topics
{god, call, give}
{work, book, publish}
{son, year, death}
{land, century, early}
{water, park, boat}
{car, race, vehicle}

Ursula Southeil (c. 1488–1561) (possibly Ursula Southill or Ursula Soothtell[1]), better known as Mother Shipton, was an English soothsayer and prophetess. The first publication of her prophecies, which did not appear until 1641, eighty years after her reported death, contained a number of mainly regional predictions, but only two prophetic verses – neither of which foretold the End of the World, despite widespread assumptions to that effect.[2]

One of the most notable editions of her prophecies was published in 1684.[2] It states that she was born in Knaresborough, Yorkshire, in a cave now known as Mother Shipton's Cave, that along with the Petrifying Well and associated parkland is operated as a visitor attraction. She was reputed to be hideously ugly. The book also claims that she married Toby Shipton, a local carpenter, near York in 1512 and told fortunes and made predictions throughout her life.

It is recorded in the diaries of Samuel Pepys that whilst surveying the damage to London caused by the Great Fire in the company of the Royal Family they were heard to discuss Mother Shipton's prophecy of the event.[3]

Contents

Prophecies

The most famous claimed edition of Mother Shipton's prophecies foretells many modern events and phenomena. Widely quoted today as if it were the original, it contains over a hundred prophetic rhymed couplets in notably non-sixteenth-century language and includes the now-famous lines:

This supposed prophecy has appeared over the years with different dates and in (or about) several countries (for example in the late 1970s many news articles about Mother Shipton appeared setting the date at 1981[citation needed]). However, this version did not appear in print until 1862, and its true author, one Charles Hindley, subsequently admitted in print that he had invented it.[5]

ANCIENT PREDICTION,

"(Entitled by Popular tradition 'Mother Shipton's Prophecy,')

Published in 1448, republished in 1641.

Carriages without horses shall go,
And accidents fill the world with woe.
Around the world thoughts shall fly
In the twinkling of an eye.
The world upside down shall be
And gold be found at the root of a tree.
Through hills man shall ride,
And no horse be at his side.
Under water men shall walk,
Shall ride, shall sleep, shall talk.
In the air men shall be seen,
In white, in black, in green;
Iron in the water shall float,
As easily as a wooden boat.
Gold shall be found and shown
In a land that's now not known.
Fire and water shall wonders do,
England shall at last admit a foe.
The world to an end shall come,
In eighteen hundred and eighty one."

Full article ▸

related documents
Igaluk
Parable of the Pearl
Horned Serpent
Arcas
Mixcoatl
Balius and Xanthus
Boann
Monthu
Ægir
Hlidskjalf
Iacchus
Empusa
Angitia
Graeae
Annwn
Andjety
Andraste
Oduduwa
Fafnir
Shango
Hygieia
Delphinus
Manwë
Land of Goshen
Esus
Telchines
Juggernaut
Varda
Bṛhaspati
Succubus