Vagina

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The vagina (from Latin vagÄ­na, literally "sheath" or "scabbard") is a fibromuscular tubular tract leading from the uterus to the exterior of the body in female placental mammals and marsupials, or to the cloaca in female birds, monotremes, and some reptiles. Female insects and other invertebrates also have a vagina, which is the terminal part of the oviduct. The Latinate plural "vaginae" is rarely used in English.

The word vagina is quite often incorrectly used to refer to the vulva or female genitals generally; strictly speaking, the vagina is a specific internal structure.

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Location and structure

The human vagina is an elastic muscular canal that extends from the cervix to the vulva.[1]

Although there is wide anatomical variation, the length of the unaroused vagina of a woman of child-bearing age is approximately 6 to 7.5 cm (2.5 to 3 in) across the anterior wall (front), and 9 cm (3.5 in) long across the posterior wall (rear).[2] During sexual arousal the vagina expands in both length and width.[3] Its elasticity allows it to stretch during sexual intercourse and during birth to offspring.[4] The vagina connects the superficial vulva to the cervix of the deep uterus.

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