Varuna

related topics
{god, call, give}
{theory, work, human}
{island, water, area}
{law, state, case}
{language, word, form}
{ship, engine, design}
{line, north, south}


The God Varuna on his mount makara, 1675-1700

In Vedic religion, Varuna (Sanskrit varuṇa वरुण) is a god of the sky, of water and of the celestial ocean, as well as a god of law and of the underworld. He is the most prominent Asura in the Rigveda, and lord of the heavens and the earth.

In Hindu mythology, Varuna continued to be considered the god of all forms of the water element, particularly the oceans.

Contents

Vedic Varuna

As chief of the Adityas, Varuna has aspects of a solar deity though, when opposed to Mitra, he is rather associated to the night, and Mitra to the daylight. As the most prominent Asura, however, he is mostly concerned with moral and societal affairs than being a deification of nature. Together with Mitra–originally 'agreement' (between tribes) personified—being master of ṛtá, he is the supreme keeper of order and god of the law.

Varuna and Mitra are the gods of the societal affairs including the oath, and are often twinned Mitra-Varuna (a dvandva compound). Varuna is also twinned with Indra in the Rigveda, as Indra-Varuna (when both cooperate at New Year in re-establishing order [1]).

As a sky god, Varuna may either correspond to, or rule over, the dark half of the sky—or celestial ocean (Rasā)[2]—or represent the 'dark' side of the Sun as it travels back from West to East during the night [3].

The Rgveda and Atharvaveda[4] portrays Varuna as omniscient, catching liars in his snares. The stars are his thousand-eyed spies, watching every movement of men.

Full article ▸

related documents
Heimdall
Oracle
Hel (location)
Olokun
Angel Moroni
Sin-offering
Exodus
Tomte
Ezra
Harpy
Hephaestus
Bragi
Song of Songs
Merlin
Philistines
Ezekiel
Gullveig
The Great Divorce
Vritra
Polyphemus
Dylan Ail Don
Book of Micah
Elysium
Semiramis
Aeneid
Apis (Egyptian mythology)
Ennead
Artemis
Silmaril
Perun