Vermiform appendix

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In human anatomy, the appendix (or vermiform appendix; also cecal (or caecal) appendix; also vermix) is a blind-ended tube connected to the cecum (or caecum), from which it develops embryologically. The cecum is a pouchlike structure of the colon. The appendix is located near the junction of the small intestine and the large intestine.

The term "vermiform" comes from Latin and means "worm-shaped".

Contents

Size and location

The appendix averages 10 cm in length, but can range from 2 to 20 cm. The diameter of the appendix is usually between 7 and 8 mm. The longest appendix ever removed measured 26 cm from a patient in Zagreb, Croatia.[1] The appendix is located in the right lower quadrant of the abdomen, or, more specifically, the right iliac fossa.[2] Its position within the abdomen corresponds to a point on the surface known as McBurney's point (see below). While the base of the appendix is at a fairly constant location, 2 cm below the ileocecal valve,[2] the location of the tip of the appendix can vary from being retrocecal (74%)[2] to being in the pelvis to being extraperitoneal. In rare individuals with situs inversus, the appendix may be located in the lower left side.

Vestigiality

The most common explanation for the appendix's existence in humans is that it's a vestigial structure which has lost its original function. In The Story of Evolution, Joseph McCabe argued:

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