View Park-Windsor Hills, California

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View Park-Windsor Hills is a census-designated place (CDP) in Los Angeles County, California, United States. The population was 10,958 at the 2000 census. View Park lies on the north end of the CDP, along Angeles Vista Boulevard; Windsor Hills is on the southern end, to the north of Slauson Avenue.

View Park-Windsor Hills is one of the both wealthiest and wealthiest majority-African American areas in the United States. The two communities are part of a band of districts, from Culver City's Fox Hills district on the west to the Los Angeles district of Leimert Park on the east, that compose the single largest geographically contiguous middle- and upper-class black area in the United States. (Also included in this band are the equally affluent Baldwin Hills and Ladera Heights and middle-class Baldwin Village.)

Contents

History

2000 11,958
1990 11,769
1980 12,101
1970 12,268

View Park was developed in the 1920s as an upper-middle-class neighborhood akin to Cheviot Hills, Brentwood, Carthay Circle, and Studio City. Along with neighboring Ladera Heights and Baldwin Hills, it is one of the wealthiest African-American areas in the United States. It contains a superb collection of houses in the Spanish Colonial and Mediterranean styles, most of which remain today. Windsor Hills underwent development in the late 1930s; aimed at the middle class, it was the first subdivision in Southern California for which the newly created Federal Housing Administration provided mortgage insurance. African-Americans were forbidden residence in either area until the Supreme Court's invalidation of racial restrictive covenants in 1948.

Prior to the 1960s, the area was known as "Pill Hill" on account of the large number of doctors who were supposed to live there. After the arrival of Black families starting in the mid-1960s, the wealthy neighborhoods were sometimes called the "Golden Ghetto" or the "Black Beverly Hills."

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