Viscus

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In anatomy, a viscus (pronounced /ˈvɪskəs/) is an internal organ, and viscera is the plural form.[1][2] The viscera, when removed from a butchered animal, are known collectively as offal. Internal organs are also known as "innards", or less formally, "guts" (which may also refer to the gastrointestinal tract).

The adjective visceral, also splanchnic,[3] is used for anything pertaining to the internal organs. Historically, viscera of animals were examined by Roman pagan priests like the haruspices or the augurs in order to define the future by their shape, dimensions or other factors. This practice remains an important ritual in some remote, tribal societies.

Contents

Human viscera

Abdomen

Pelvis and perineum

Innervation

The viscera are mainly innervated parasympathetically by the vagus nerve and sympathetically by the splanchnic nerves. The sensory part of the latter reaches the spinal column at certain spinal segments. Pain in any viscera is perceived as referred pain, more specifically pain from the dermatome corresponding to the spinal segment.[4]

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