Willard, Kansas

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Willard is a city in Shawnee and Wabaunsee counties in the U.S. state of Kansas. The population was 86 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Topeka, Kansas Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Contents

History

Before 1883, Willard was not much of a town but when the Rock Island Railroad laid tracks through the community, Willard became the typical railroad town. In the early 1920s, Willard boasted a population of over 300 and was a major cattle shipping point for this region. During the 1930s many businesses closed, the railroad became less important and, finally, in 1951, a flood destroyed much of the town and caused the bridge over the Kansas River collapsed isolating the town from surrounding communities.

Geography

Willard is located at 39°5′38″N 95°56′36″W / 39.09389°N 95.94333°W / 39.09389; -95.94333 (39.093917, -95.943334)[3].

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.1 square miles (0.3 km²).None of the area is covered with water.

Demographics

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 86 people, 38 households, and 22 families residing in the city. The population density was 806.5 people per square mile (301.9/km²). There were 50 housing units at an average density of 468.9/sq mi (175.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 97.67% White, 1.16% Native American, 1.16% from other races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.14% of the population.

There were 38 households out of which 28.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.0% were married couples living together, 7.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 42.1% were non-families. 36.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.26 and the average family size was 3.09.

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