Wok

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A wok (in Standard Cantonese or simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; Jyutping: wok6) is a versatile round-bottomed cooking vessel originating in China. It is used especially in East and Southeast Asia.

Woks are most often used for stir frying, but can also be used many other ways, such as in steaming, deep frying, braising, stewing, smoking, or making soup. They are commonly, almost exclusively, cooked with a long handled chahn (spatula) or hoak (ladle). The long extensions of these utensils allow the cook to work with the food without burning the hand.

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Regional variants

Standard Mandarin refers to woks using a different character, "guō" (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; literally "cooking pot"), or with the phrases "guōzi" (simplified Chinese: 锅子; traditional Chinese: 鍋子), or "chǎo cài guō" (simplified Chinese: 炒菜锅; traditional Chinese: 炒菜鍋). In Indonesia the wok is known as a penggorengan or wajan. In Malaysia it is called a kuali (small wok) or kawa (big wok). In the Philippines it is known as a kawali and also called a "wadjang". In Japan the wok is called a chukanabe (literally, "Chinese pot"). In India, two varieties of the wok exist: a more traditional chinese style wok with a wider diameter called the "cheena chatti" (literally, "Chinese pot" in Malayalam and Tamil), and a slightly deeper vessel with a narrower diameter and a similar shape, known as a karahi.

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