Xia Dynasty

related topics
{god, call, give}
{theory, work, human}
{land, century, early}
{country, population, people}
{church, century, christian}
{son, year, death}
{build, building, house}
{language, word, form}
{line, north, south}
{rate, high, increase}
{style, bgcolor, rowspan}
{album, band, music}

Chinese historiography
Timeline of Chinese history
Dynasties in Chinese history
Linguistic history
Art history
Economic history
Education history
Science and technology history
Legal history
Media history
Military history
Naval history

The Xia Dynasty (Chinese: ; pinyin: Xià Cháo; Wade–Giles: Hsia-Ch'ao; IPA: [ɕiâ tʂʰɑ̌ʊ̯]; ca. 2070 BC–ca. 1600 BC) is the first dynasty in China to be described in ancient historical chronicles such as Records of the Grand Historian and Bamboo Annals, succeeded by the Shang Dynasty (1600 BC–1046 BC). According to Warring States and Han Dynasty texts, the Xia Dynasty was established by the legendary Yu the Great[1] after Shun gave his throne to him, and was later defeated and replaced by the Shang.

According to the traditional chronology based upon calculations by Liu Xin, the Xia ruled between 2205 and 1766 BC; according to the chronology based upon the Bamboo Annals, it ruled between 1989 and 1558 BC. The Xia Shang Zhou Chronology Project concluded that the Xia existed between 2070 and 1600 BC. The tradition of tracing Chinese political history from heroic early emperors to the Xia to succeeding dynasties comes from the idea of the Mandate of Heaven, in which only one legitimate dynasty can exist at any given time, and was promoted by the Rú (儒) school (including Confucius) in the Eastern Zhou period, later becoming the basic position of imperial historiography and ideology. Although the Xia is an important element in early Chinese history, reliable information on the history of China before 13th century BC can only come from archaeological evidence,[2] thus the concrete existence of the Xia is yet to be proven, despite efforts by Chinese archaeologists to link Xia with archaeological sites.[3]

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
Asura
Antithesis
Myth
Tribe of Judah
Tribe of Naphtali
Ophir
Fir Bolg
Rta
Qibla al-Qudsiyya
Three Sovereigns and Five Emperors
Gath (city)
Xanthos
Anishinaabe traditional beliefs
Lothlórien
Ho-Chunk mythology
Protesilaus
Rohe (mythology)
Nehebkau
Thomas the Rhymer
Ajalon
Melicertes
Sites and places associated with Arthurian legend
Gula
Epopeus
Laima
Bel (mythology)
Nienna
Trojan Horse
Abundantia
Ophion