Yawara

related topics
{@card@, make, design}
{film, series, show}
{ship, engine, design}
{law, state, case}
{language, word, form}
{country, population, people}

The yawara (also called pasak or dulodulo in Filipino martial arts) is a Japanese weapon used in various martial arts. It is also the specific weapon of yawarajutsu.[1]

The Yawara originated from the use of Kongou, a Buddhist symbolic object, by various monks during Feudal Japan. The Yawara takes the form of one or two small, thick sticks which stick out about an inch from each side of the hand. They are usually used in pairs to initiate throws, bone breaks, and pressure point strikes.

The yawara stick was popularized for police officers in the 1940s by Professor Frank A. Matsuyama. Matsuyama also made his own lethal version in 1937 or earlier.[1][2]

Contents

Legality

In the USA, yawaras are not intrinsically illegal (in all US jurisdictions). In the United Kingdom "any article made or adapted for use for causing injury to the person, or intended by the person having it with him for such use" is defined as an offensive weapon under the Prevention of Crime Act 1953 [3] thus likely including a yawara stick.

Yawarajutsu

Yawarajutsu or Yawara Jutsu is a system of martial arts. It is sometimes simply referred to as yawara, and this name has been used interchangeably with jujutsu. There are similarities in the kanji for Yawara (柔) and Jujutsu (柔術). The yawari, tessen (iron fan), and short stick are used to apply yawara or jujutsu techniques. The yawara movements are believed to have been derived from the sheathed knife techniques of tantojutsu.

In popular culture

  • Fictional comic strip character Modesty Blaise often uses a single yawara, which she calls a "kongo".[4]
  • Tommy Okase in J. T. Edson's Ole Devil series uses a yawara.
  • The yawara plays an important role in the 2004 movie Twisted.
  • Cold Steel, a blade and weapon speciality company, markets the Pocket Shark, a durable, reinforced polymer permanent marker designed to hold up to impact and pressure with the intention of being used as a yawara. Cold Steel also markets the Koga SD series, of structural nylon, for use as short batons.

See also

Full article ▸

related documents
Luxembourgian euro coins
Lithic core
Brown
Trefoil
Heelflip
Daishō
Kerchief
Stereotyping
Diapering
Dot matrix
Falchion
Ground stone
Human leg
Randori
Field camera
Genbukan
Malawian kwacha
Abatis
Microlith
Bridge piercing
Quill
Calico (textile)
Dale Chihuly
Indigo
Surcoat
Ishihara color test
Lur
Tool stone
Zocchihedron
Test tube