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Princeton Project on National Security
National Security in the 21st Century

Conference Agenda - September 29-30, 2005
Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ


Thursday, September 29

10:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Opening Session

Welcome and Project Update

G. John Ikenberry and Anne-Marie Slaughter, Project Co-Directors

Working Group Summary Reports:

Grand Strategic Choices
Francis Fukuyama and G. John Ikenberry, Co-Chairs

State Security & Transnational Threats
Peter Bergen and Laurie Garrett, Co-Chairs

Economics & National Security
Daniel K. Tarullo, Co-Chair

Reconstruction & Development
Frederick Barton and Michael Froman, Co-Chairs

Anti-Americanism
Tod Lindberg and Suzanne Nossel, Co-Chairs

Relative Threat Assessment
Christopher Chyba, Harold Feiveson and David Victor, Co-Chairs

Global Institutions & Foreign Policy Infrastructure
Joseph S. Nye and Anne-Marie Slaughter, Co-Chairs

12:30 p.m.– 2:00 p.m.
Working Lunch and Roundtable Discussion
Framing Principles and Propositions, Part 1

  • What are the basic principles that should inform specific national security strategies and polices in the coming decades?
  • What are the areas of bipartisan agreement?

Moderators: G. John Ikenberry and Anne-Marie Slaughter

2:15 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.
Allies, Rivals and Rogues: Shaping the system for the 21st century

  • Is the transatlantic relationship outdated? Who will be our allies in next half century and how should we work with them?
  • How should we manage the rise of China and India?
  • What are our best options for dealing with rogue states and Jihadist terrorism?

Moderator: Leslie H. Gelb, President Emeritus, Council on Foreign Relations

4:00 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.
Understanding, Ranking and Responding to Transnational Threats

  • Which transnational threats constitute direct threats to U.S. national security?
  • How should indirect threats factor into the security calculus?
  • What institutional capacity is needed to assess and address these threats? Are new partnerships and cooperative arrangements needed?

Moderator: G. John Ikenberry, Albert G. Milbank Professor of Politics and International Affairs, Woodrow Wilson Schooll of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University

7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
What is Missing from Current Debates about National Security Strategy?

Zbigniew Brzezinski, Trustee and Counselor, Center for Strategic and International Studies

Friday, September 30

8:00 a.m. -- 9:00 a.m.
What is Missing from Current Debates about National Security Strategy?

Michael Klein, Chief Executive Officer, Global Banking, Citigroup Inc.

9:00 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.
Proactive Approaches to National Security

  • How should we prioritize areas of engagement for assisting failed, failing, and developing states?
  • Is democracy promotion the path forward?
  • What can soft power, public diplomacy and just plain old fashioned diplomacy do for us?

Moderator: Lawrence J. Korb, Senior Fellow, Center for American Progress, and Senior Advisor to the Center for Defense Information

10:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.
Principles in Action: China as a case study

  • Is the rise of this large emerging market a threat or an opportunity?
  • What are the security implications of China’s demand for global energy and resources?
  • How do we work with China to prevent avian flu or other pandemics?
  • What would democracy promotion mean in practice?
  • How do we view China’s role in the developing world? How will their interests and priorities differ?
  • To what extent is China less an example and really the most important country to think about?

Moderator: Ambassador Robert Hutchings, Diplomat in Residence, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University

12:00 noon – 1:00 p.m.
Closing Lunch and Roundtable Discussion
Framing Principles and Propositions, Part 2

  • What are the basic principles that should inform specific national security strategies and polices in the coming decades?
  • What are the areas of bipartisan agreement?

Moderators: G. John Ikenberry and Anne-Marie Slaughter

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