VIS 201 / ARC 201

Drawing I

Professor/Instructor

Eve Michele Aschheim

This course approaches drawing as a way of thinking and seeing. Students will be introduced to a range of drawing issues, as well as a variety of media, including charcoal, graphite, ink, and oil stick. Subject matter includes still life, the figure, landscape, and architecture. Representation, abstraction, and working from imagination will be explored. A structured independent project will be completed at the end of the term. Two studio classes, five hours total per week.

VIS 202 / ARC 202

Drawing I

Professor/Instructor

Nathan A. Carter, Kurt Kauper

This course approaches drawing as a way of thinking and seeing. Students will be introduced to a range of drawing issues, as well as a variety of media, including charcoal, graphite, ink, and oil stick. Subject matter includes still life, the figure, landscape, and architecture. Representation, abstraction, and working from imagination will be explored. A structured independent project will be completed at the end of the term. Two studio classes, five hours total per week.

ARC 203

Introduction to Architectural Thinking

Professor/Instructor

A broad overview of the discipline of architecture: its history, theories, methodologies, and its manners of thinking and working. Rather than a chronological survey, the course will be organized thematically, with examples drawn from a range of historical periods as well as contemporary practice. Through lectures, readings, precepts, and studio sessions, students will acquire a working knowledge of key texts, buildings, and architectural concepts. Two lectures, one preceptorial.

ARC 204

Introduction to Architectural Design

Professor/Instructor

Paul Lewis

The first in a series of design studios offered to students interested in majoring in architecture. The course will introduce architecture as an "impure'' plastic art, inseparable from a network of forces acting upon it. The student will be confronted with progressively complex exercises involving spatial relations in two dimensions, three dimensions, and time. The course will stress experimentation while providing an analytical and creative framework to develop an understanding of structure and materials as well as necessary skills in drawing and model making. Two three-hour studios with lectures included.

URB 201 / WWS 201 / SOC 203 / ARC 207

Introduction to Urban Studies

Professor/Instructor

M. Christine Boyer

This course will examine different crises confronting cities in the 21st century. Topics will range from immigration, to terrorism, shrinking population, traffic congestion, pollution, energy crisis, housing needs, water wars, race riots, extreme weather conditions, war and urban operations. The range of cities will include Los Angles, New Orleans, Paris, Logos, Caracas, Havana, New York, Hong Kong, and Baghdad among others.

ENE 202 / ARC 208 / EGR 208 / ENV 206

Designing Sustainable Systems

Professor/Instructor

Forrest Michael Meggers

The course presents anthropogenic global changes and their impact on sustainable design. The course focuses on the mechanistic understanding of the underlying principles based in simple concepts from natural and applied sciences. Based on a reflection of successes and failures, it indicates the feasibility of the necessary changes and critically discusses alternatives. The material is presented in 2 parts: 1) Global Change and Environmental Impacts: studying our influences on basic natural systems and cycles, and 2) Designing Sustainable Systems: studying potential solutions to these challenges through an applied design project.

ART 201 / ARC 209

Roman Architecture

Professor/Instructor

Michael Koortbojian

This course will examine the architecture of the Romans, from its mythic beginnings (as recounted, for example, by Vitruvius) to the era of the high empire. Topics will include: city planning; the transformation of the building trades; civic infrastructure; and the full breadth of Roman structures, both public and private. For department majors, this course satisfies the Group 1 distribution requirement.

ART 242 / ARC 242 / CEE 242

The Experience of Modernity: A Survey of Modern Architecture in the West

Professor/Instructor

Esther Roseli da Costa Azevedo Meyer

An analysis of the emergence of modern architecture from the late 19th century to World War II, in light of new methodologies. The course will focus not only on major monuments but also on issues of gender, class, and ethnicity to provide a more pluralistic perspective on the experience of modernity. For department majors, this course satisfies the Group 3 distribution requirement. Two lectures, one preceptorial.

CEE 262B / ARC 262 / EGR 262 / URB 262

Structures and the Urban Environment

Professor/Instructor

Maria Eugenia Moreyra Garlock

This course focuses on structural engineering as a new art form begun during the Industrial Revolution and flourishing today in long-span bridges, thin shell concrete vaults, and tall buildings. Through laboratory experiments students study the scientific basis for structural performance and thereby connect external forms to the internal forces in the major works of structural engineers. Students examine contemporary exemplars that are essential to the understanding of 21st century structuring of cities with illustrations taken from various cities in the U.S. and abroad. Two lectures, one three-hour laboratory.

CEE 262A / ARC 262 / EGR 262 / URB 262 / ART 262

Structures and the Urban Environment

Professor/Instructor

Maria Eugenia Moreyra Garlock

This course focuses on structural engineering as a new art form begun during the Industrial Revolution and flourishing today in long-span bridges, thin shell concrete vaults, and tall buildings. Through laboratory experiments students study the scientific basis for structural performance and thereby connect external forms to the internal forces in the major works of structural engineers. Students examine contemporary exemplars that are essential to the understanding of 21st century structuring of cities with illustrations taken from various cities in the U.S. and abroad. Two lectures, one preceptorial.

ARC 302 / ART 347

Architecture and the Visual Arts

Professor/Instructor

Spyros Papapetros

Explores the relationships between architectural discourse and the visual arts from the historical avant-garde to the present. Architectural discourse will be considered here as the intersection of diverse systems of representation: buildings, projects, drawings, but also architectural theory and criticism, exhibitions, photographs, professional magazines, and the popular press. The course will treat as visual arts not only painting and sculpture, but also photography, cinema, fashion, advertisement, and television. Two lectures, one preceptorial.

ARC 304

Cities of the 21st Century

Professor/Instructor

M. Christine Boyer

Examination of a range of urban spatial types, city plans, maps, and communication networks. Focus on how inherited models have been used by modern architects/planners in the 20th century. One 90-minute lecture, one 90-minute preceptorial.

ARC 305

Urban Studies: Analysis of Contemporary Urban Form

Professor/Instructor

Studies of the contemporary problems and process of urban design and physical planning. Analysis of the design and organization of space, activities, movement, and interaction networks of the urban physical environment. One three-hour seminar.

ARC 308 / ART 328

History of Architectural Theory

Professor/Instructor

Lucia Allais

Architectural theory, criticism, and historiography from the Renaissance to the present, emphasizing the transformations of the classical Vitruvian tradition and theories of modern architecture from the end of the 17th century to the 1930s. Architectural thought in its institutional and cultural context and as it relates to design method and practice. Two lectures, one preceptorial.

ART 351 / ARC 310 / EAS 357

Traditional Chinese Architecture

Professor/Instructor

Thematic introduction to traditional Chinese architecture, urban design, and garden building, with attention to principles and symbolism of siting and design; building techniques; modularity of structures and interchangeability of palace, temple, tomb, and domestic design; regional variation. For department majors, this course satisfies the Group 2 distribution requirement. Two 90-minute classes.

ARC 311

Building Science and Technology: Building Systems

Professor/Instructor

Nat Oppenheimer

An introduction to the nature of building. Emphasis will be placed on understanding construction methods, materials, and evaluating the processes by which architects formulate strategies to execute their design ideas. A continuing theme will be to evaluate the relationship between architectural design and building systems and technology. Two lectures, one two-hour laboratory.

ART 315 / ARC 315

Medieval Architecture

Professor/Instructor

Historical patterns of development in Western European architecture between 300 and 1300: Early Christian through Gothic, with emphasis on Romanesque and Gothic innovations. For department majors, this course satisfies the Group 2 distribution requirement. Two lectures, one preceptorial.

ART 320 / ARC 320

Rome, the Eternal City

Professor/Instructor

The fabric and image of the city seen in planning, architecture, and the works of artists and writers. Attention to the city as an ideal and an example, from its foundation to the present, with emphasis on major periods. For department majors, this course satisfies the Group 2 distribution requirement. Two lectures, one preceptorial.

VIS 203 / ARC 327

Painting I

Professor/Instructor

Kurt Kauper

An introduction to the materials and methods of painting. The areas to be covered are color and its interaction, the use of form and scale, painting from a model, painting objects with a concern for their mass, and interaction with light. Two three-hour studio classes.

VIS 204 / ARC 328

Painting I

Professor/Instructor

Eve Michele Aschheim

An introduction to the materials and methods of painting. The areas to be covered are color and its interaction, the use of form and scale, painting from a model, painting objects with a concern for their mass, and interaction with light. Two studio classes, five hours total per week.

ART 332 / ARC 332

The Landscape of Allusion: Garden and Landscape Architecture, 1450-1750

Professor/Instructor

The concept of nature from the Renaissance through the 18th century as seen in European gardens and landscape architecture. Major consideration will be given to the Italian villa-garden complex, the French classical garden, and the English romantic garden and park as evidence of large-scale planning. For department majors, this course satisfies the Group 2 distribution requirement. Two lectures, one preceptorial.

ART 333 / ARC 333

Renaissance and Baroque Architecture

Professor/Instructor

Carolyn Yerkes

European architecture from 1420 to the mid-18th century with particular emphasis on its historical and social background. The various architectural movements--Renaissance, baroque, and rococo--are studied in terms of important architects and buildings especially of Italy, France, and England. For department majors, this course satisfies the Group 2 distribution requirement. Two lectures, one preceptorial.

CEE 364 / ARC 364

Materials in Civil Engineering

Professor/Instructor

Claire Emily White

An introductory course on materials used civil and environmental engineering. Lectures on structure and properties of construction materials including concrete, steel, glass and timber; fracture mechanics; strength testing; mechanisms of deterioration; impact of material manufacturing on the environment. Labs on brittle fracture, heat treatment of steel, strength of concrete, mechanical properties of wood. Prerequisites: CEE 205.

ARC 374

Computational Design

Professor/Instructor

Axel Kilian

This course will examine the possibilities of representation and information in the virtual realm. Through a series of modeling/rendering/compositing exercises, presentations, and in-class discussions, students will investigate the evolving relationship between architecture and its means of representation, as well as broader issues of technology and culture. The course will provide a firm understanding of current computer software. One three-hour seminar.

ARC 401

Theories of Housing and Urbanism

Professor/Instructor

Andrew Laing

Housing ideas and urban projects of architects and social scientists since the mid-19th century as a response to industrialization, the development of the welfare state, the rise of professionalism, and the dispersion of democratic culture. Material drawn from architecture, urban planning, political theory, sociology, and social psychology. One three-hour seminar.