ART 100

An Introduction to the History of Art: Meanings in the Visual Arts

Professor/Instructor

Andrew James Hamilton

A team-taught introduction to the history of art and to the discipline of art history. Faculty members of the Department of Art and Archaeology lecture in their fields of expertise; precepts in the renowned Princeton University Art Museum facilitate direct engagement with works of art. Not a comprehensive survey but a sampling of arts -- painting, sculpture, architecture, photography and prints -- and artistic practices from diverse historical periods, regions, and cultures. The course balances consideration of historical developments and methods of interpretation with attention to individual works of art.

ART 102

An Introduction to the History of Architecture

Professor/Instructor

A survey of architectural history in the West, from ancient Egypt to 20th-century America, stressing a critical approach to architectural form through the analysis of context, expressive content, function, structure, style, and theory. Discussion will focus on key monuments and readings that have shaped the history of architecture. Two lectures, one preceptorial.

CEE 105 / ART 105 / EGR 105

Lab in Conservation of Art

Professor/Instructor

This course examines how environmental factors (acid, rain, ice, salts, biota) damage sculpture and monuments made of stone and masonry, paintings on wood, and sculptures in bronze. It examines campus buildings that illustrate each type of damage and uses a visit to the Cloisters Museum to learn how those medieval buildings are protected. Lectures on structure and properties of materials and mechanisms of attack. Labs include quantifying water movement through stone, damage from freezing and salts, strength of mortars, protective effects of sealants and consolidants, effect of moisture on wood. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory.

ART 200 / NES 205

The Art and Archaeology of the Ancient Near East and Egypt

Professor/Instructor

The art and archaeology of the ancient Near East and Egypt from the end of the prehistoric period, ca. 3000 B.C., to the beginning of the Iron Age, ca. 650 B.C. Focus on the rise of complex societies and the attendant development of architectural and artistic forms that express the needs and aspirations of these societies. Occasional readings in original texts in translation will supplement the study of art and architecture. For department majors, this course satisfies the Group 1 distribution requirement. Two lectures, one preceptorial.

ART 201 / ARC 209

Roman Architecture

Professor/Instructor

Michael Koortbojian

This course will examine the architecture of the Romans, from its mythic beginnings (as recounted, for example, by Vitruvius) to the era of the high empire. Topics will include: city planning; the transformation of the building trades; civic infrastructure; and the full breadth of Roman structures, both public and private. For department majors, this course satisfies the Group 1 distribution requirement.

ART 203

Roman Art

Professor/Instructor

Michael Koortbojian

Roman painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts from the early Republic to the late Empire, focusing upon the official monuments of Rome itself and the civic and private art of Pompeii and Herculaneum. Emphasis on historical representation, imperial propaganda, portraiture, narrative technique, and classical art theory. For department majors, this course satisfies the Group 1 distribution requirement. Two lectures, one preceptorial.

ART 205 / HLS 205

Medieval Art in Europe

Professor/Instructor

The art of Europe from the fall of Rome to the Renaissance. Emphasis on the effects of cultural, religious, and political change on artistic production. Works treated include the Lindisfarne Gospels, the Bayeux Tapestry, Chartres Cathedral, and the Ste. Chapelle. For department majors, this course satisfies the Group 2 distribution requirement. Two lectures, one preceptorial.

ART 206 / HLS 206

Byzantine Art and Architecture

Professor/Instructor

Charlie Barber

Art and architecture of the Eastern Mediterranean and Eastern Europe ca. 600-1500. The course will focus on the art of the Byzantine Empire and its capital, Constantinople, and on its broad sphere of cultural influence (Russia, Armenia, Georgia, Sicily, Venice, Serbia, Bulgaria, Rumania). An examination of principal factors that shaped the artistic legacy of eastern Christendom during the Middle Ages. Offered in alternate years. For department majors, this course satisfies the Group 2 distribution requirement. Two lectures, one preceptorial.

ART 210

Italian Renaissance Painting and Sculpture

Professor/Instructor

A selective survey, 1260-1600, allowing discussion of themes such as patronage; functions; materials and techniques; emulation as motivation; social, political, and economic issues; aesthetics; and the professions of the artist and of the art historian. Artists treated include Giotto, Masaccio, Donatello, Bellini, Leonardo, Raphael, Michelangelo, and Titian. For department majors, this course satisfies the Group 2 distribution requirement. Two lectures, one preceptorial.

ART 211

Major Figures in American Art

Professor/Instructor

Rachael Ziady DeLue

A selective overview of key figures from the 18th to the 20th century, with each lecture devoted to a single painter, architect, or sculptor as representative of significant themes in the history of American art. Among the artists considered are Copley, Jefferson, Cole, Homer, Eakins, Richardson, Saint-Gaudens, Olmsted, and O'Keeffe. Two lectures, one preceptorial. For department majors, this course satisfies the Group 3 distribution requirement.

ART 212

Neoclassicism through Impressionism

Professor/Instructor

Bridget A. Alsdorf

A broad study of European painting and sculpture from the French Revolution to 1900 with special attention to art's relationship to social and cultural changes. Lectures will explore a range of themes including art and revolution, the rise of landscape, shifting conceptions of realism, and the birth of "modernism" and the avant-garde. Emphasis on major figures including David, Canova, Goya, Ingres, Turner, Courbet, Manet, Monet, Degas, Rodin, Van Gogh, and Cézanne. For department majors, this course satisfies the Group 3 distribution requirement. Two lectures, one preceptorial.

ART 213

Modernist Art: 1900 to 1950

Professor/Instructor

Hal Foster

A critical study of the major movements, paradigms, and documents of modernist art from fauvism to art brut. Among the topics covered are primitivism, abstraction, collage, the readymade, machine aesthetics, photographic reproduction, the art of the insane, artists in political revolution, anti-modernism. For department majors, this course satisfies the Group 3 distribution requirement. Two lectures, one preceptorial.

ART 214

Contemporary Art: 1950 - 2000

Professor/Instructor

AnnMarie Perl

A critical study of the major movements, paradigms, and documents of postwar art--abstract-expressionist, pop, minimalist, conceptual, process and performance, site-specific, etc. Special attention to crucial figures (e.g., Jackson Pollock, Andy Warhol, Robert Smithson) and problems (e.g., "the neo-avant-garde," popular culture, feminist theory, political controversies, "postmodernism"). For department majors, this course satisfies the Group 3 distribution requirement. Two lectures, one preceptorial.

ART 216

Chinese Painting

Professor/Instructor

Thematic introduction to the role of painting in Chinese cultural history, with attention to the interaction of stylistic standards, materials, and techniques; the impact of regional geographies on landscape painting; the influence of class, gender, and social behavior on figure painting; the engagement of art with traditional philosophies and 20th-century socialism; and the shape of time in art-historical development. For department majors, this course satisfies the Group 2 distribution requirement. Three lectures.

ART 217 / EAS 217

The Arts of Japan

Professor/Instructor

Andrew Mark Watsky

Surveys arts of Japan from the pre-historic period through the present day. Painting, sculpture, and architecture form the core of study. Examines critical role of other forms, including calligraphy, lacquer, and ceramics. Takes close account of the broader cultural and historical contexts in which art was made. Topics include ongoing tension in Japanese art between foreign and indigenous, role of ritual in Japan's visual arts, re-uses of the past, changing loci of patronage, and formats and materials of Japanese art. For department majors, this course satisfies the Group 1, 2, or 3 distribution requirement. Two lectures, one preceptorial.

ART 219

Northern Renaissance Art

Professor/Instructor

The course surveys painting, prints, and sculpture in the Netherlands, Germany, and France from about 1350-1550. With emphasis on the work of major figures such as Van Eyck, Bosch, Dürer, and Bruegel, the course will consider changing circumstances of artistic production, function, iconography, and patronage. For department majors, this course satisfies the Group 2 distribution requirement. Two lectures, one preceptorial.

ART 221 / LAS 221

Art of Hispania

Professor/Instructor

Painting, sculpture, and architecture in the Spanish-speaking world from 1492 to 1810. The great flowering of Spanish art, as represented by such figures as El Greco, Velázquez, and Goya, in its cultural and historical context, including developments in Latin America. Some attention to the art of Portugal. For department majors, this course satisfies the Group 2 distribution requirement. Two lectures, one preceptorial.

ART 230 / NES 230

Early Islamic Art and Architecture

Professor/Instructor

A survey of art in the Islamic world from 600 through 1200. The course examines the formation of Islamic art and its roots in the art of late antiquity. Emphasis will be on the development of various types of religious and secular architecture and their decoration (wall-painting, carved stucco and wood, mosaic and epigraphy) in the central regions of the early Islamic world. Topics such as textiles, metalwork, and ceramics will be considered. For department majors, this course satisfies either the Group 1 or 2 distribution requirement. Two lectures, one preceptorial.

ART 232 / NES 232

The Arts of the Islamic World

Professor/Instructor

A survey of the architecture and the arts of various Islamic cultures between northern Africa and the Indian subcontinent from the seventh to the 20th century. Emphasis will be on major monuments of religious and secular architecture, architectural decoration, calligraphy, and painting. Background in Islam or Middle Eastern languages is not a prerequisite. For department majors, this course satisfies the Group 1, 2, or 3 distribution requirement. Two lectures, one preceptorial.

ART 242 / ARC 242 / CEE 242

The Experience of Modernity: A Survey of Modern Architecture in the West

Professor/Instructor

Esther Roseli da Costa Azevedo Meyer

An analysis of the emergence of modern architecture from the late 19th century to World War II, in light of new methodologies. The course will focus not only on major monuments but also on issues of gender, class, and ethnicity to provide a more pluralistic perspective on the experience of modernity. For department majors, this course satisfies the Group 3 distribution requirement. Two lectures, one preceptorial.

ART 248

Photography's History from Analog to Digital

Professor/Instructor

Anne McCauley

A survey of photography from its multiple inventions in the early 19th century to its omnipresence (and possible obsolescence) in the 21st. Themes will include photography's power to define the "real"; its emulation and eventual transformation of the traditional fine arts; and its role in the construction of personal and collective memories. For department majors, this course satisfies the Group 3 distribution requirement. Two lectures, one preceptorial.

ART 256

Writing as Art

Professor/Instructor

In China, Japan, Islamic world, and other cultures, writing is ranked as highest of the visual arts, far above painting, sculpture, even architecture. Forms taken by beautiful writing are at least as diverse as the writing systems that underlie them: think of Egyptian writing, Chinese calligraphy, and Roman monumental inscriptions. This course introduces world's major calligraphic traditions and examine the functions of beautiful writing, reasons for its existence and prestige, and factors that shape styles of writing. For department majors, this course satisfies the Group 2 distribution requirement. One three-hour seminar.

CEE 262A / ARC 262 / EGR 262 / URB 262 / ART 262

Structures and the Urban Environment

Professor/Instructor

Maria Eugenia Moreyra Garlock

This course focuses on structural engineering as a new art form begun during the Industrial Revolution and flourishing today in long-span bridges, thin shell concrete vaults, and tall buildings. Through laboratory experiments students study the scientific basis for structural performance and thereby connect external forms to the internal forces in the major works of structural engineers. Students examine contemporary exemplars that are essential to the understanding of 21st century structuring of cities with illustrations taken from various cities in the U.S. and abroad. Two lectures, one preceptorial.

ART 266

Introduction to Pre-Columbian Art

Professor/Instructor

General survey of the indigenous civilizations of North America, Central America, and South America. The goals are to demonstrate methods and techniques employed by art historians working in this area to study the past, and to examine how art history, archaeology, and ethnohistory contribute to the interdisciplinary study of ancient peoples. For department majors, this course satisfies the Group 1 distribution requirement. Two lectures, one preceptorial.

ART 267 / LAS 267 / ANT 366

Mesoamerican Art

Professor/Instructor

Bryan R. Just

This course acquaints students with the art, architecture, and archaeology of ancient Mexico and Central America. The course considers a wide range of cultures spanning from the first arrival of humans at the end of the Upper Paleolithic period through the 16th century Spanish invasion. Major culture groups to be considered include Olmec, Teotihuacan, Maya, Zapotec, and Aztec. Precepts will include theoretically-focused discussions, debate regarding contested scholarly interpretations, and hands-on work with objects at the Princeton University Art Museum. For department majors, this course satisfies the Group 1 distribution requirement.