CHM 201

General Chemistry I

Professor/Instructor

Michael H. Hecht, Robert Paul L'Esperance, Sonja Angelique Francis

An introductory course. Principles of chemistry; understanding the world around us; structure and reactions of atoms and molecules; laboratory manipulations, preparations, and analysis. Fulfills medical school entrance requirements in general chemistry and qualitative analysis. Three lectures, one class, one three-hour laboratory.

CHM 202

General Chemistry II

Professor/Instructor

Andrew Bruce Bocarsly, Robert Paul L'Esperance, Sonja Angelique Francis

Continuation of 201. Principles of chemistry; introduction to chemical bonding and solid state structure; chemical kinetics, nuclear chemistry; descriptive inorganic chemistry; laboratory manipulations, preparations, and analysis. Fulfills medical school entrance requirements in general chemistry and qualitative analysis. Three lectures, one class, one three-hour laboratory.

CHM 203

Advanced General Chemistry I

Professor/Instructor

The fundamental principles of chemistry; descriptive chemistry, molecular structure, and bonding. Lectures and demonstrations. Laboratory includes qualitative and quantitative methods in chemical analysis, as well as selected experiments in general chemistry. Fulfills medical school entrance requirements in general chemistry and qualitative analysis. Three lectures, one class, one three-hour laboratory.

CHM 204

Advanced General Chemistry II

Professor/Instructor

Continuation of 203. Topics in chemistry selected to illustrate fundamental principles; electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, bonding, and descriptive chemistry focusing on inorganic chemistry. Lectures and demonstrations. Laboratory includes qualitative and quantitative methods in chemical analysis, as well as selected experiments in general chemistry. Fulfills medical school entrance requirements in general chemistry and qualitative analysis. Three lectures, one class, one three-hour laboratory.

CHM 207

Advanced General Chemistry: Materials Chemistry

Professor/Instructor

Robert Paul L'Esperance, Haw Yang, Bruce E. Koel

Introduction to the basic concepts of chemistry: stoichiometry, types of reactions, thermodynamics, quantum mechanics, and chemical bonding. Introduction to the structure, chemistry, and properties of technologically important materials: metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and polymers. Fulfills medical school requirements in general chemistry and qualitative analysis. Three lecture hours, one class, one three-hour laboratory.

CHM 215

Advanced General Chemistry: Honors Course

Professor/Instructor

Paul J. Chirik, Robert Paul L'Esperance, Sonja Angelique Francis

An intensive study of fundamental theoretical and experimental principles. Topics are drawn from physical, organic, and inorganic chemistry. For students with excellent preparation who are considering scientific careers. Fulfills medical school entrance requirements in general chemistry and qualitative analysis. Completion of 215 qualifies the student for 300-level courses and some 400-level courses after consultation with the instructor of the upper-level course. Three lectures, one class, one three-hour laboratory.

ISC 231 / CHM 231 / COS 231 / MOL 231 / PHY 231

An Integrated, Quantitative Introduction to the Natural Sciences I

Professor/Instructor

Thomas Gregor, Eric Francis Wieschaus, Martin Helmut Wühr

An integrated, mathematically and computationally sophisticated introduction to physics, chemistry, molecular biology, and computer science. Alternative to the combination of PHY 103-104, CHM 201-202, MOL 214 and COS 126. Students must enroll in ISC231 and ISC232 in the fall and ISC233 and ISC234 in the spring. Prerequisites: familiarity with calculus at the level of MAT103/104 or Advanced Placement Calculus BC, solid high school physics and chemistry courses. Five lectures, one three-hour laboratory, one three-hour computational laboratory, one evening problem session.

ISC 232 / CHM 232 / COS 232 / MOL 232 / PHY 232

An Integrated, Quantitative Introduction to the Natural Sciences I

Professor/Instructor

Thomas Gregor, Eric Francis Wieschaus, Martin Helmut Wühr

An integrated, mathematically and computationally sophisticated introduction to physics, chemistry, molecular biology, and computer science. Alternative to the combination of PHY 103-104, CHM 201-202, MOL 214 and COS 126. Students must enroll in ISC 231 and ISC 232 in the fall and ISC 233 and ISC 234 in the spring. Prerequisites: familiarity with the calculus at the level of MAT 103-104 or Advanced Placement Calculus BC, solid high school physics and chemistry courses. Five lectures, one three-hour laboratory, one three-hour computational laboratory, one evening problem session.

ISC 233 / CHM 233 / COS 233 / MOL 233 / PHY 233

An Integrated, Quantitative Introduction to the Natural Sciences II

Professor/Instructor

Joshua William Shaevitz, Olga G. Troyanskaya, Martin Helmut Wühr

An integrated, mathematically and computationally sophisticated introduction to physics and chemistry, drawing on examples from biological systems. Alternative to the combination of PHY 103-104, CHM 201-202, MOL 214, and COS 126. Students must enroll in ISC 231 and ISC 232 in the fall and ISC 233 and ISC 234 in the spring. Prerequisites: familiarity with the calculus at the level of MAT 103-104 or Advanced Placement Calculus BC, solid high school physics and chemistry courses. Five lectures, one three-hour laboratory, one three-hour computational laboratory, one evening problem session.

ISC 234 / CHM 234 / COS 234 / MOL 234 / PHY 234

An Integrated, Quantitative Introduction to the Natural Sciences II

Professor/Instructor

Joshua William Shaevitz, Olga G. Troyanskaya, Martin Helmut Wühr

An integrated, mathematically and computationally sophisticated introduction to physics and chemistry, drawing on examples from biological systems. Alternative to the combination of PHY 103-104, CHM 201-202, MOL 214 and COS 126. Students must enroll in ISC 231 and ISC 232 in the fall and ISC 233 and ISC 234 in the spring. Prerequisites: familiarity with the calculus at the level of MAT 103-104 or Advanced Placement Calculus BC, solid high school physics and chemistry courses. Five lectures, one three-hour laboratory, one three-hour computational laboratory, one evening problem session.

GEO 255B / AST 255 / EEB 255 / CHM 255

Life in the Universe

Professor/Instructor

Tullis C. Onstott, Christopher F. Chyba, A. James Link

Introduces students to Astrobiology, a new field where scientists trained in biology, chemistry, astrophysics and geosciences combine their skills to unravel life's origins and to search for extraterrestrial life. Topics include: the astrophysical prerequisites for life, the RNA world, the evolution of metabolism and photosynthesis, microbes in extreme environments, and the search for life within our solar system and in nearby solar systems. Two 90 minute lectures and field training in Yellowstone National Park over Fall break is required. Prerequisite: one geoscience, chemistry, biology or astronomy class or instructors' permission.

GEO 255A / AST 255 / CHM 255

Life in the Universe

Professor/Instructor

Tullis C. Onstott, Christopher F. Chyba, A. James Link

Introduces students to Astrobiology, a new field where scientists trained in biology, chemistry, astrophysics and geosciences combine their skills to unravel life's origins and to search for extraterrestrial life. Topics include: the astrophysical prerequisites for life, the RNA world, the evolution of metabolism and photosynthesis, microbes in extreme environments, and the search for life within our solar system and in nearby solar systems. Two 90 minute lectures. Track A will be required to take a mid-term exam during Fall break. Prerequisite: one geoscience, chemistry, biology or astronomy class or instructors' permission.

CHM 301

Organic Chemistry I: Biological Emphasis

Professor/Instructor

Martin F. Semmelhack, Henry Lee Gingrich, Susan Killian VanderKam

This course is designed as the first part of a three-semester sequence, CHM 301 and CHM 302, and MOL 345 (biochemistry). CHM 301 will introduce the principles of organic chemistry, including the structures, properties, and reactivity of organic compounds. The emphasis will be on bonding and structure, structural analysis by spectroscopy, and an introduction to the mechanisms of organic reactions. Examples will be taken from biology when appropriate to illustrate the principles. For a complete presentation of the subject, the course should be followed by CHM 302 or CHM 304 in the spring. Three lectures, one class, one three-hour laboratory.

CHM 302

Organic Chemistry II with Biological Emphasis

Professor/Instructor

Martin F. Semmelhack, Henry Lee Gingrich

The concepts introduced in CHM 301 are extended to the structures and reactions of more complex molecules, with an emphasis on how organic chemistry provides the framework for understanding molecular processes in biology. The fundamental concepts of organic chemistry are illustrated, as often as possible, with examples drawn from biological systems. Appropriate for chemistry and engineering majors, premedical students, and students with an interest in organic chemistry and its central position in the life sciences. Prerequisite: CHM 301. Two 90-minute lectures, one class, one three-hour laboratory.

CHM 304

Organic Chemistry II: Foundations of Chemical Reactivity and Synthesis

Professor/Instructor

Erik J. Sorensen, Henry Lee Gingrich

Continuation of CHM 301. The concepts introduced in CHM 301 will be extended to the structures and reactions of more complex molecules, with an emphasis on how organic chemistry provides the framework for understanding molecular processes in biology. The fundamental concepts of organic chemistry will be illustrated, as often as possible, with examples drawn from biological systems. Prerequisite: 301. Three lectures, one class, one three-hour laboratory.

CHM 305

The Quantum World

Professor/Instructor

Gregory D. Scholes, Kyra Schwarz

An introduction to quantum mechanics for students interested in the relevance to chemistry, molecular biology, and energy science. A conceptual understanding is emphasized. Covers some of the historical development of the quantum theory to show how quantum theory was a step-change in thinking. Examines the (sometimes subtle) ways that quantum systems are different than classical systems. Includes the discussion of modern examples including molecular electronic structure calculations, organic solar cells, photosynthesis, nanoscience, quantum computing, and quantum biology. Three lectures, one preceptorial.

CHM 306

Physical Chemistry: Chemical Thermodynamics and Kinetics

Professor/Instructor

Michael T. Kelly

Introduction to chemical thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, and kinetics. Special emphasis on biological problems, including nerve conduction, muscle contraction, ion transport, enzyme mechanisms, and macromolecular properties in solutions. Prerequisites: CHM 201 and CHM 202, or CHM 203 (or CHM 207) and CHM 204, or CHM 215; MAT 104; PHY 101 and 102, or PHY 103 and 104; or instructor's permission. Three lectures, one class.

CEE 311 / CHM 311 / GEO 311 / ENE 311

Global Air Pollution

Professor/Instructor

Mark Andrew Zondlo

The chemical and physical processes involved in the transformation, transport, sources, and sinks of air pollutants on local to global scales. Topics include photochemical smog, particulate matter, greenhouse gases, and stratospheric ozone depletion. Students will have the unique opportunity to analyze chemical and physical data acquired in real-time from the NSF Gulfstream-V research aircraft as it probes the atmosphere from the Earth's surface to the lower stratosphere over a latitudinal range from the Arctic to the Antarctic. A wide range of environments will be studied, from very clean, remote portions of the globe to urban megacities.

GEO 363 / CHM 331 / ENV 331

Environmental Chemistry: Chemistry of the Natural Systems

Professor/Instructor

Satish Chandra Babu Myneni

Covers topics including origin of elements; formation of the Earth; evolution of the atmosphere and oceans; atomic theory and chemical bonding; crystal chemistry and ionic substitution in crystals; reaction equilibria and kinetics in aqueous and biological systems; chemistry of high-temperature melts and crystallization process; and chemistry of the atmosphere, soil, marine, and riverine environments. The biogeochemistry of contaminants and their influence on the environment will also be discussed. Two 90-minute lectures. Prerequisite: one term of college chemistry or instructor's permission.

CHM 333 / ENV 333 / GEO 333

Chemistry of the Environment

Professor/Instructor

The nature of the environment from a chemical perspective. Topics include energy and fuels, greenhouse effect, ozone, air pollution, food production, pesticides, metals pollution, carcinogens and anti-oxidants. Three lectures, one class.

MOL 345 / CHM 345

Biochemistry

Professor/Instructor

Fundamental concepts of biomolecular structure and function will be discussed, with an emphasis on principles of thermodynamics, binding and catalysis. A major portion of the course will focus on metabolism and its logic and regulation. Prerequisites: MOL 214 and either CHM 302/304 or CHM 337. CHM 302/304 may be taken concurrently with MOL 345.

CHM 371

Experimental Chemistry

Professor/Instructor

Michael T. Kelly, Chia-Ying Wang

This course addresses the principles of experimental design, data acquisition, analysis and interpretation, and the presentation of experimental results. Students are exposed to a broad range of quantitative laboratory methods in preparation for thesis work in the chemical sciences. Typical laboratory exercises include inorganic synthesis, physical characterization, spectroscopy, kinetics, thermodynamics, instrument design, and computational chemistry. Lectures on principles of physical analysis with varieties of instruments and statistical analysis of collected data. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratories per week.

CHM 403

Advanced Organic Chemistry

Professor/Instructor

John Taylor Groves, Mohammad R. Seyedsayamdost

Applies the principles of organic chemistry to biochemistry. Explores enzymology through the lenses of physical organic chemistry, bioinorganic chemistry, catalysis. Covers how proteins orchestrate the reactivity of functional groups, the range of cofactors employed to extend the scope and diversity of biocatalysis, enzymatic systems controlled by their kinetics, and how knowledge of enzyme reaction mechanisms enables modern drug design. Prerequisites: CHM 301 and CHM 302/CHM 304. Two 90-minute lectures, one preceptorial.

CHM 405

Advanced Physical Chemistry: Quantum Mechanics

Professor/Instructor

Introduction to quantum theory, atomic and molecular structure, and spectroscopy. This course will emphasize the development of fundamental underlying principles and illustrative examples. Prerequisites: 202, 204, or 215; MAT 201 or 203 (required); MAT 202 or 204 (very helpful, even if taken concurrently); PHY 103 (may be taken concurrently) or AP Physics. Three lectures, one preceptorial.

CHM 406

Advanced Physical Chemistry: Chemical Dynamics and Thermodynamics

Professor/Instructor

Chia-Ying Wang

Statistical thermodynamics, kinetics, and molecular reaction dynamics. Prerequisites: background in thermodynamics as developed in CHM 202, CHM 204, or CHM 215; MAT 201 or equivalent. Two 90-minute lectures.