PHI 303 / ECS 306

Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz

Professor/Instructor

Daniel Garber

Readings in continental philosophy of the early modern period, with intensive study of the works of Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz. Topics to be specially considered include: knowledge, understanding, and sense-perception; existence and necessity; the nature of the self and its relation to the physical world. Two 90-minute classes.

GER 308 / ECS 307

Topics in German Film History and Theory

Professor/Instructor

Thomas Yaron Levin

What is film? Is it a language? Can one speak of cinematic literacy? Does film transform perception? Is there filmic thinking? This seminar on the theory and poetics of cinema will examine the varieties of ways -- semiotic, psychoanalytic, narratological - that filmmakers, philosophers and critics have analyzed film form, the cinematic experience, the construction of cinematic subjectivity, questions of aesthetic politics and notions of medium specificity.

COM 318 / ECS 319

The Modern Period

Professor/Instructor

Susana Draper

Modern Western literature in the perspective of its development since the Industrial Revolution. The peculiarity of "modernist'' style exemplified by various genres. Significant philosophical trends that define the parallel development of modern art and thought. Texts from English, German, French, and other literatures. Two lectures, one preceptorial.

ECS 320

Cultural Systems

Professor/Instructor

Symbolic systems and social life in specific historical eras. Topics will vary. Recent courses include, for example, magic, art, and science in Renaissance culture, political discourse and nationalism, culture and inequality, history of technology, and the rhetoric of new media.

ECS 321 / SPA 333 / COM 389

Cultural Systems

Professor/Instructor

Rubén Gallo

Symbolic systems and social life in specific historical eras. Topics will vary. Recent courses include, for example, magic, art, and science in Renaissance culture, political discourse and nationalism, culture and inequality, history of technology, and the rhetoric of new media.

ECS 330

Communication and the Arts

Professor/Instructor

The arts and the media in different cultures. Topics will vary, for example, history of the book, art/architecture and society, opera and nationalism, literature and photography, theater and politics.

ECS 331 / HIS 430 / COM 317

Communication and the Arts

Professor/Instructor

Anthony Thomas Grafton

The arts and the media in different cultures. Topics will vary, for example, history of the book, art/architecture and society, opera and nationalism, literature and photography, theater and politics.

ECS 340 / COM 340

Literature and Photography

Professor/Instructor

Eduardo Lujan Cadava

A survey of the history of the rapport between literature and photography, looking closely at a number of literary and theoretical texts that differently address questions central to both literature and photography: questions about the nature of representation, reproduction, memory and forgetting, history, images, perception, and knowledge. One three-hour seminar.

COM 341 / ECS 341 / HUM 341

What is Vernacular Filmmaking? - Rhetoric for Cinema Studies

Professor/Instructor

Erika Anita Kiss

In this course we will study films that address global audiences yet ground themselves in particular, local, vernacular sources of artistic creation. Our focus will be on three exciting postwar cinematic movements (Italian Neorealism, Iranian New Wave, the Danish Dogma 95), but we will also discuss parallels in American filmmaking. Familiarity with Homer's Ulysses, Virgil's Aeneid and Shakespeare's Hamlet will be helpful since they serve as the frame of reference for many of the examined films.

GER 370 / ART 331 / ECS 370

Weimar Germany: Painting, Photography, Film

Professor/Instructor

Brigid Doherty

The visual arts in Germany during the Weimar Republic (1918-1933). Works of art, cinema, and literature in historical context. Topics include: modernism and modernity; Expressionism, Dada, New Objectivity in painting, photography, cinema, and literature; historical conditions of bodily experience and visual perception; emergence of new artistic and technological media; expansion of mass culture; place of politics in art; experience and representation of metropolitan life; changes in the conceptualization and representation of individuality, collectivity, embodiment, race, class, gender, sexuality. Two 90-minute seminars, one film screening.

COM 370 / HUM 371 / ECS 377 / ART 361

Topics in Comparative Literature

Professor/Instructor

Rachel Bowlby

Study of a selected theme or topic in comparative literature. Subjects will range from historical and cultural questions (literature and politics, the literature of the avant-garde) to the study of specific literary themes or topics (feminine autobiography, the grotesque in literature).

HIS 424 / ECS 424

Intellectual History of Europe since 1880

Professor/Instructor

Anson G. Rabinbach

Major themes and figures in European thought and culture in the transition from the 19th to the 20th century. Focuses on the intellectual response to new forms of personal and social experience in the age of organized capitalism and imperialism, and the attempt to come to terms with the waning of romantic and revolutionary expectations inherited from the period before 1850. Two lectures, one preceptorial.

ART 448 / ECS 448

Seminar. 17th- and 18th-Century Art

Professor/Instructor

Thomas DaCosta Kaufmann

Topics in 17th- and 18th-century art and architecture. For department majors, this course satisfies the Group 2 distribution requirement. Prerequisite: a course in the art of this period or instructor's permission. One three-hour seminar.

ART 454 / ECS 454

Topics in the History of Photography

Professor/Instructor

Anne McCauley

Topics on the aesthetic and stylistic development of photography, including the study of movements and related critical theory, and on the artistic achievement of particular photographers. For department majors, this course satisfies the Group 3 distribution requirement. One three-hour seminar.

ART 458 / ECS 458 / ARC 458 / FRE 458

Seminar. Modern Architecture

Professor/Instructor

Esther Roseli da Costa Azevedo Meyer

A study of some of the major themes and movements of modern architecture from the late 19th century to the present day. Students will be encouraged to examine the social and political context, to probe the architects' intellectual background, and consider issues of class and gender in their relation to architectural and urban form. For department majors, this course satisfies the Group 3 distribution requirement. One three-hour seminar.