CEE 102A / EGR 102 / MAE 102

Engineering in the Modern World

Professor/Instructor

Michael G. Littman

Lectures and readings focus on bridges, railroads, power plants, steamboats, telegraph, highways, automobiles, aircraft, computers, and the microchip. Historical analysis provides a basis for studying societal impact by focusing on scientific, political, ethical, and aesthetic aspects in the evolution of engineering over the past two and a half centuries. The precepts and the papers will focus historically on engineering ideas including the social and political issues raised by these innovations and how they were shaped by society as well as how they helped shape culture. Two lectures, one preceptorial.

CEE 102B / EGR 102 / MAE 102

Engineering in the Modern World

Professor/Instructor

Michael G. Littman

Lectures and readings focus on bridges, railroads, power plants, steamboats, telegraph, highways, automobiles, aircraft, computers, and the microchip. We study some of the most important engineering innovations since the industrial revolution. The laboratory centers on technical analysis that is the foundation for design of these major innovations. The experiments are modeled after those carried out by the innovators themselves, whose ideas are explored in the light of the social environment within which they worked. Two lectures, one three-hour laboratory.

MAE 206

Introduction to Engineering Dynamics

Professor/Instructor

N. Jeremy Kasdin

Formulation and solution of equations governing the dynamic behavior of engineering systems. Fundamental principles of Newtonian mechanics. Kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies. Motion relative to moving reference frames. Impulse-momentum and work-energy relations. Free and forced vibrations of mechanical systems. Introduction to dynamic analysis of electromechanical and fluid devices and systems. Two lectures, one laboratory. Prerequisites: MAT 201, PHY 103, and MAE 223 or CEE 205.

MAE 221 / ENE 221

Thermodynamics

Professor/Instructor

Lamyaa El-Gabry

Heat and work in physical systems. Concepts of energy conversion and entropy, primarily from a macroscopic viewpoint. Applications to engines, heat pumps, refrigeration, and air-conditioning systems. In the laboratory students will carry out experiments in the fields of analog electronics and thermodynamics. For MAE concentrators only, a combined final laboratory grade will be issued in the spring laboratory course 224, which includes the laboratory work of both 221 and 224. Three lectures, one class, and one three-hour laboratory. Prerequisites: PHY 103 and MAT 201, which may be taken concurrently.

MAE 222 / CEE 208

Mechanics of Fluids

Professor/Instructor

Marcus Nils Hultmark

Introduction to the physical and analytical description of phenomena associated with the flow of fluids. Topics include the principles of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy; lift and drag; open channel flow; dynamic similitude; laminar and turbulent flow. Three lectures, one preceptorial. Prerequisites: MAT 104 and 202; MAT 202 may be taken concurrently.

MAE 223 / CEE 323

Modern Solid Mechanics

Professor/Instructor

Andrej Kosmrlj

Fundamental principles of solid mechanics: equilibrium equations, reactions, internal forces, stress, strain, Hooke's law, torsion, beam bending and deflection, and deformation in simple structures. Integrates aspects of solid mechanics with applications to mechanical and aerospace structures (engines and wings), and microelectronic and biomedical devices (thin films). Topics include stress concentration, fracture, plasticity, fatigue, visco-elasticity and thermal expansion. The course synthesizes descriptive observations, mathematical theories, and engineering consequences. Two 90-minute lectures. Prerequisites: MAT 104, and PHY 103.

MAE 224

Integrated Engineering Science Laboratory

Professor/Instructor

Marcus Nils Hultmark

Core laboratory course for concentrators, who carry out experiments in the fields of digital electronics, fluid mechanics, and dynamics. Students also complete an independent research project. Continuation of the laboratory component of 221; a combined final grade will be issued based upon laboratory work in both 221 and 224. Prerequisite: 221 Typically taken concurrently with 222. One three-hour laboratory, one class.

MAE 228 / EGR 228 / CBE 228 / ENE 228

Energy Technologies in the 21st Century

Professor/Instructor

Jay Burton Benziger

Addresses issues of regional and global energy demands, including sources, carriers, storage, current and future technologies, costs for energy conversion, and their impact on climate and the environment. Also focuses on emissions and regulations for transportation. Students will perform cost-efficiency and environmental impact analyses from source to end-user on both fossil fuels and alternative energy sources. Designed for both engineering and non-engineering concentrators. Two 90-minute lectures, one preceptorial.

MAE 305 / MAT 391 / EGR 305 / CBE 305

Mathematics in Engineering I

Professor/Instructor

Stanislav Yefimovic Shvartsman, Howard A. Stone

An introduction to ordinary differential equations. Use of numerical methods. Equations of a single variable and systems of linear equations. Method of undermined coefficients and method of variation of parameters. Series solutions. Use of eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Laplace transforms. Nonlinear equations and stability; phase portraits. Partial differential equations via separation of variables. Sturm-Liouville theory. Three lectures. Prerequisites: MAT 201 or 203, and MAT 202 or 204, or MAE 303.

MAE 306 / MAT 392

Mathematics in Engineering II

Professor/Instructor

Mikko Petteri Haataja

Solution of partial differential equations. Complex variable methods. Characteristics, orthogonal functions, and integral transforms. Cauchy-Riemann conditions and analytic functions, mapping, the Cauchy integral theorem, and the method of residues with application to inversion of transforms. Applications to diffusion, wave and Laplace equations in fluid mechanics and electrostatics. Three lectures, one preceptorial. Prerequisite: 305 or equivalent.

AST 309 / MAE 309 / PHY 309 / ENE 309

The Science of Nuclear Energy: Fission and Fusion

Professor/Instructor

Robert James Goldston

We develop the scientific ideas behind fission and fusion energy. For fission we move from elementary nuclear physics to calculations of chain reactions, understanding how both reactors and nuclear weapons work. We examine safety and waste concerns, as well as nuclear proliferation. We look at new reactor concepts. For fusion we address the physics of confining hot, ionized gases, called plasmas. We address the control of large-scale instabilities and small-scale turbulence. We examine progress and prospects, as well as challenges, for the development of economically attractive fusion power.

MAE 321

Engineering Design

Professor/Instructor

Glenn Arther Northey

Focus on design processes and procedures using modern engineering tools. Parametric design techniques are introduced in the computer-design laboratory along with simulation tools. Instruction in basic and computer-based manufacturing methods is given in the manufacturing laboratory. Teams of students conduct projects that involve the complete design cycle from concept and first principles through optimization, prototype, and test. Two lectures, one laboratory. Prerequisites: 206, 221, 222, and 223 or CEE 205, or instructor's permission.

MAE 322

Mechanical Design

Professor/Instructor

Daniel Mark Nosenchuck

This course builds on the technical foundation established in 321, and extends the scope to include a range of advanced mechanical design. Teams of students will design and fabricate a wheeled robotic system that will draw upon multidisciplinary engineering elements. The robot will facilitate common daily tasks which vary each year. CAD, CAE, and CAM will be utilized in the design/simulation/prototype process. Labs are designed to reinforce and expand CAD and CAE skills. Two 90-minute lectures, one laboratory. Prerequisites: 321 or instructor's permission.

MAE 324 / MSE 324

Structure and Properties of Materials

Professor/Instructor

Craig B. Arnold

An introduction to the properties of engineering materials that emphasizes the correlation between atomic and microscopic structure and the macroscopic properties of the materials. Topics include structural, mechanical, thermodynamic, and design-related issues important to engineering applications. Two lectures, one preceptorial.

CEE 361 / MAE 325 / MSE 331

Matrix Structural Analysis and Introduction to Finite-Element Methods

Professor/Instructor

Maurizio Maria Chiaramonte

The course begins with an overview of finite element methods for a one-dimensional model problem including the weak, Galerkin and matrix forms. Extension of the finite element to multiple dimensions are carried for second order scalar and vector valued equations. Applications in heat transfer, fluid and solid mechanics will be discussed. The course then concludes with the Cº approach to plates and beams. Element formulation, data structures, isoparametric interpolations, locking, analysis of error and convergence, constraints as well as variational crimes will all be discussed. Prerequisite: CEE 205/MAE 223 or permission of instructor.

MAE 328 / EGR 328 / ENV 328 / ENE 328

Energy for a Greenhouse-Constrained World

Professor/Instructor

Julia Mikhailova

This course addresses, in technical detail, the challenge of changing the future global energy system to accommodate constraints on the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. Energy production strategies are emphasized, including renewable energy, nuclear fission and fusion, the capture and storage of fossil-fuel carbon, and hydrogen and low-carbon fuels. Efficient energy use is also considered, as well as intersections of energy with economic development, international security, local environmental quality, and human behavior and values. Two 90-minute lectures.

MAE 331

Aircraft Flight Dynamics

Professor/Instructor

Robert Frank Stengel

Introduction to the performance, stability, and control of aircraft. Fundamentals of configuration aerodynamics. Methods for analyzing the dynamics of physical systems. Characterization of modes of motion and desirable flying qualities. Two 90-minute lectures. Prerequisites: 206 and 222.

MAE 332

Aircraft Design

Professor/Instructor

Luigi Martinelli

Building on strength of materials and calculus, this course integrates physical laws to analyze stress and displacement fields in structures. The course introduces basic concepts and equations in three dimensions and then applies them to aircraft structures. Phenomena to be discussed include elastic anisotropy, bending, buckling, fracture, and fatigue. The course is important for anyone interested in structured design. Two 90-minute lectures. Prerequisites: 335 or instructor's permission.

MAE 335

Fluid Dynamics

Professor/Instructor

Luigi Martinelli

Low-speed incompressible potential flow theory and high speed compressible flows. Low-speed topics include circulation, vorticity, d'Alembert's paradox, potential flows, and finite wing theory. High-speed topics include speed of sound, nozzles, shock waves, expansion waves, and effects of heat addition and friction. Three lectures, one preceptorial. Prerequisites: 221, 222 or instructor's permission.

MAE 336

Viscous Flows

Professor/Instructor

Daniel Mark Nosenchuck

Viscous flow with main emphasis on boundary layer theory. Derivation of Navier-Stokes equations, the boundary layer approximations and boundary conditions. Studies of typical laminar boundary layers, the transition problem, semi-empirical analysis of turbulent boundary layers, and convective heat transfer. Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods for viscous flow.

MAE 339

Independent Work

Professor/Instructor

Luigi Martinelli

Independent work is intended for juniors doing only a one-term project. Students develop a topic of their own or select from a list of topics prepared by the faculty. They develop a work plan and select an adviser and are assigned a second reader. At the end of the term, students submit a written report and make a presentation to faculty, staff, fellow students, and guests. Enroll in either 339 for fall or 340 for spring. This course does not fulfill the departments independent work or thesis requirement.

MAE 339D

Independent Work with Design

Professor/Instructor

Luigi Martinelli

Independent work with design is intended for juniors doing only a one-term project. Similar to 339, with the principal difference that the project must incorporate aspects and principles of design in a system, product, vehicle, device, apparatus, or other design element. At the end of the term, students submit a written report and make a presentation to faculty, staff, fellow students, and guests. Enroll in 339D for fall, or 340D for spring. This course does not fulfill the departments independent work or thesis requirement.

MAE 340

Independent Work

Professor/Instructor

Luigi Martinelli

Independent work is intended for juniors doing only a one-term project. Students develop a topic of their own or select from a list of topics prepared by the faculty. They develop a work plan and select an adviser and are assigned a second reader. At the end of the term, students submit a written report and make a presentation to faculty, staff, fellow students, and guests. Enroll in either 339 for fall or 340 for spring. This course does not fulfill the departments independent work or thesis requirement.

MAE 340D

Independent Work with Design

Professor/Instructor

Luigi Martinelli

Independent work with design is intended for juniors doing only a one-term project. Similar to 340, with the principal difference that the project must incorporate aspects and principles of design in a system, product, vehicle, device, apparatus, or other design element. At the end of the term, students submit a written report and make a presentation to faculty, staff, fellow students, and guests. Enroll in 339D for fall, or 340D for spring. This course does not fulfill the departments independent work or senior thesis requirement.

MAE 341

Space Flight

Professor/Instructor

N. Jeremy Kasdin

This course addresses the various concepts that form the basis of modern space flight and astronautics. The focus is on space flight analysis and planning and not hardware or spacecraft design. The topics include space flight history, orbital mechanics, orbit perturbations, near-Earth and interplanetary mission analysis, orbit determination and satellite tracking, spacecraft maneuvers and attitude control, launch, and entry dynamics. Use of advanced software for the planning and analysis of space missions. Two 90-minute lectures. Prerequisite: 305 or instructor's permission.