NEU 101 / MOL 110 / STC 102

Neuroscience and Everyday Life

Professor/Instructor

Samuel Sheng-Hung Wang, Alan Gelperin

Acquaints non-science majors with classical and modern neuroscience. Lectures will give an overview at levels ranging from molecular signaling to cognitive science with a focus on the neuroscience of everyday life, from the general (love, memory, and personality) to the particular (jet lag, autism, and weight loss). The laboratory will offer hands-on experience in recording signals from single neurons, examining neural structures, and analysis of whole-brain functional brain imaging data. Two 90-minute lectures, one laboratory.

NEU 201 / PSY 258

Fundamentals of Neuroscience

Professor/Instructor

Ilana Basya Witten

This is a survey course in neurobiology which takes a mechanistic and reductionist perspective to cover important topics in the field, including the physiological basis of neural excitability, sensory and motor processing, learning and memory, and neuropsychiatric diseases.

NEU 202 / PSY 259

Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience

Professor/Instructor

Matthew M. Botvinick

An introduction to cognitive brain functions, including higher perceptual functions, attention and selective perception, systems for short- and long-term memory, language, cerebral lateralization, motor control, executive functions of the frontal lobe, cognitive development and plasticity, and the problem of consciousness. Major neuropsychological syndromes (e.g., agnosia, amnesia) will be discussed. Prerequisite: 258 or instructor's permission. Two 90-minute lectures, one preceptorial.

PSY 306 / NEU 306

Memory and Cognition

Professor/Instructor

Kenneth Andrew Norman

Empirical facts, theoretical issues, and scientific techniques in the area of human memory. Potential topics include models of memory, eyewitness testimony, comprehension, representation of knowledge, autobiographical memory, reality monitoring, amnesia, and other disorders of memory and cognition. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Prerequisite: 255 or 259, or instructor's permission.

NEU 330 / PSY 330

Computational Modeling of Psychological Function

Professor/Instructor

Kenneth Andrew Norman

A fundamental goal of cognitive neuroscience is to understand how psychological functions such as attention, memory, language, and decision making arise from computations performed by assemblies of neurons in the brain. This course will provide an introduction to the use of connectionist models (also known as neural network or parallel distributed processing models) as a tool for exploring how psychological functions are implemented in the brain, and how they go awry in patients with brain damage. Prerequisite: instructor's permission. Two 90-minute lectures, one laboratory.

PSY 336 / EEB 336 / NEU 336

The Diversity of Brains

Professor/Instructor

Asif A. Ghazanfar

A survey of the unique behaviors of different animal species and how they are mediated by specialized brain circuits. Topics include, for example, monogamy in voles, face recognition in primates, sex- and role-change in fish, and predation by bats. The role of evolutionary and developmental constraints on neural circuit construction will be a key underlying theme. Prerequisites: 258 or 259. One three-hour seminar.

NEU 408 / MOL 408 / PSY 404

Cellular and Systems Neuroscience

Professor/Instructor

Timothy J. Buschman, Ilana Basya Witten

A survey of fundamental principles in neurobiology at the biophysical, cellular, and system levels. Lectures will address the basis of the action potential, synaptic transmission and plasticity, local circuit computation, sensory physiology, and motor control. Prerequisites: MOL 214 or MOL 215, PSY 258, PHY 103-104, and MAT 103-104, or permission of instructor. Two 90-minute lectures, one preceptorial.

PSY 410 / NEU 410

Depression: From Neuron to Clinic

Professor/Instructor

Barry L. Jacobs

This course focuses on clinical depression as a model topic for scientific discourse. Depression is a subject of growing individual and societal importance, and it is an ideal topic because it intersects such a broad range of issues. Our work will emphasize a neurobiological approach, with topics ranging from the molecular to the clinical. Prerequisites: 208 or 258, or EEB 211, or MOL 214, and instructor's permission. One three-hour seminar.

NEU 437 / MOL 437 / PSY 437

Computational Neuroscience

Professor/Instructor

Carlos D. Brody

Introduction to the biophysics of nerve cells and synapses, and the mathematics of neural networks. How can networks of neurons compute? How do we model and analyze data from neuroscientific experiments? Data from experiments running at Princeton will be used as examples (e.g., blowfly visual system, hippocampal slice, rodent prefrontal cortex). Each topic will have a lecture and a computer laboratory component. Prerequisite: MOL 410, or elementary knowledge of linear algebra, differential equations, probability, and basic programming ability, or permission of the instructor. Two 90 minute lectures, one laboratory.

NEU 447 / MOL 447 / GHP 447

Neuroimmunology: Immune Molecules in Normal Brain Function and Neuropathology

Professor/Instructor

Lisa M. Boulanger

In this course, we will explore the diverse and complex interactions between the brain and the immune system from the perspective of current, cutting-edge research papers. In particular, we will focus on the molecular mechanisms of these interactions and their role in brain development and function as well as their potential contributions to specific neurological disorders, including autism. In the process, students will learn to read, critically evaluate, and explain in presentations the content of articles from the primary literature. Prerequisites: MOL 214/215.

NEU 501A / MOL 501

Neuroscience: from molecules to systems to behavior

Professor/Instructor

Samuel Sheng-Hung Wang

A survey of modern neuroscience in lecture format combining theoretical and computational/quantitative approaches. Topics include cellular neurophysiology, neuroanatomy, neural circuits and dynamics, neural development and plasticity, sensory systems, genetic model systems, and molecular neuroscience. This is one-half of a double-credit core course required of all Neuroscience Ph.D. students.

NEU 501B / MOL 501

Neuroscience: from molecules to systems to behavior

Professor/Instructor

David W. Tank, Alan Gelperin, Anthony E. Ambrosini

This lab course complements NEU 501A and introduces students to the variety of techniques and concepts used in modern neuroscience, from the point of view of experimental and computational/quantitative approaches. Topics will include synaptic transmission, fluorescent and viral tracers, patch clamp recording in brain slices, optogenetic methods to control neural activity, and computational modeling approaches. In-lab lectures give students the background necessary to understand the scientific content of the labs, but the emphasis is on the labs themselves. Second half of a double-credit core course required of all NEU Ph.D. students.

NEU 502A / MOL 502

From Molecules to Systems to Behavior

Professor/Instructor

Jonathan D. Cohen

A survey of modern neuroscience in lecture format combining theoretical and computational/quantitative approaches. Topics include systems and cognitive neuroscience, perception and attention, learning and behavior, memory, executive function/decision-making, motor control and sequential actions. Diseases of the nervous system are considered. This is one-half of a double-credit core course required of all Neuroscience Ph.D. students.

NEU 502B / MOL 502

From Molecules to Systems to Behavior

Professor/Instructor

Jonathan D. Cohen

This lab course complements NEU 502A and introduces students to the variety of techniques and concepts used in modern neuroscience, from the point of view of experimental and computational/quantitative approaches. Topics include electrophysiological recording, functional magnetic resonance imaging, psychophysics, and computational modeling. In-lab lectures give students the background necessary to understand the scientific content of the labs, but the emphasis is on the labs themselves. Second half of a double-credit core course required of all Neuroscience Ph.D. students.

NEU 503 / MOL 503

Neurogenetics of Behavior

Professor/Instructor

Coleen T. Murphy, Mala Murthy

How do seemingly simple organisms generate complex behaviors? Course will explore our current understanding of the genetic and neural basis for animal behavior, with an emphasis on cutting-edge research and model systems that are amenable to genetic manipulation. Each week students will discuss a new behavior with a focus on the underlying mechanisms; students will also lead discussions of primary literature. The goal of this course is to provide required background knowledge and critical thinking skills to move beyond the published literature to proposing original experiments. This effort will culminate in a final paper from each student.

NEU 511 / PSY 511

Current Issues in Neuroscience and Behavior

Professor/Instructor

Timothy J. Buschman, Michael James Berry II

An advanced seminar that reflects current research on the brain and behavior. Research by seminar participants and articles from the literature are discussed.

NEU 537 / MOL 537 / PSY 517

Computational Neuroscience and Computing Networks

Professor/Instructor

Carlos D. Brody

An Introduction to the biophysics of nerve cells and synapses, the mathematical description of neural networks, and how neurons represent information. Course will survey computational modeling and data analysis methods for neuroscience and will parallel some topics from 549, but from a computational perspective. Topics will include representation of visual informaion, spatial navigation, short-term memory, and decision-making. Two 90 minute lectures, one laboratory. Lectures in common with MOL 437. Graduate students will carry out and write up an in-depth semester-long project. Prerequisite: 410, or elementary knowledge of linear algebra, di

PSY 591A / NEU 591

Responsible Conduct of Research (Half-Term)

Professor/Instructor

Sabine Kastner

Examination of issues in the responsible conduct of scientific research, including the definition of scientific misconduct, mentoring, authorship, peer review, grant practices, use of humans and of animals as subjects, ownership of data, and conflict of interest. Class will consist primarily of the discussion of cases. Required of all first and second year graduate students in the Department of Psychology. Open to other graduate students.

NEU 593 / PSY 593

Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Professor/Instructor

Ray F. Lee

An introduction to some common imaging techniques and their applications. Labs provide opportunities to practice pulse sequence design and image reconstruction.