PHY 101

Introductory Physics I

Professor/Instructor

A course in fundamental physics that covers classical mechanics, fluid mechanics, basic thermodynamics, sounds, and waves. Meets premedical requirements. One lecture, three classes, one three-hour laboratory.

PHY 102

Introductory Physics II

Professor/Instructor

Continuation of 101. A course in fundamental physics that covers electricity, magnetism, and an introduction to the quantum world. Meets premedical requirements. Two 90-minute lectures, one preceptorial, and one three-hour laboratory.

PHY 103

General Physics I

Professor/Instructor

The physical laws that govern the motion of objects, forces, and forms of energy in mechanical systems are studied at an introductory level. Calculus-based, primarily for engineering and science students, meets premedical requirements. Some preparation in physics and calculus is desirable; calculus may be taken concurrently. One demonstration lecture, three classes, one three-hour laboratory.

PHY 104

General Physics II

Professor/Instructor

Continuation of 103. Electromagnetism from electrostatics, DC and AC circuits to optics, and topics of modern physics are treated at an introductory level. Some preparation in physics and calculus is desirable; calculus may be taken concurrently. Calculus-based, primarily for engineering and science students, meets premedical requirements. One demonstration lecture, three classes, one three-hour laboratory.

PHY 105

Advanced Physics (Mechanics)

Professor/Instructor

This course parallels 103 at a level that assumes a good preparation in physics and calculus. The material is treated in more depth and with more mathematical sophistication than in 103. Students interested in 105 should enroll in 103. After three weeks, the course will reorganize with those students who qualify and are interested in entering 105 for the remainder of the term. Either course can lead to a major in physics. One demonstration lecture, three classes, one three-hour laboratory.

PHY 106

Advanced Physics (Electromagnetism)

Professor/Instructor

Parallels 104 at a more sophisticated level, emphasizing the unification of electric and magnetic forces and electromagnetic radiation. To enter this course, students must have done well in 103 or 105. 103 students must attend the lectures on special relativity given in reading period as part of 105. Three lectures, one class, one three-hour laboratory.

PHY 115A / STC 115

Physics for Future Leaders

Professor/Instructor

What do future leaders of our society need to know about physics and technology? The course is designed for non-scientists who will someday become our influential citizens and decision-makers. Whatever the field of endeavor, they will be faced with important decisions in which physics and technology play an important role. The purpose of this course is to present the key principles and the basic physical reasoning needed to interpret scientific and technical information and to make the best decisions. Topics include energy and power, atomic and subatomic matter, wave-like phenomena and light, and Einstein's theory of relativity.

PHY 115B / STC 115

Physics for Future Leaders

Professor/Instructor

What do future leaders of our society need to know about physics and technology? The course is designed for non-scientists who will someday become our influential citizens and decision-makers. Whatever the field of endeavor, they will be faced with important decisions in which physics and technology play an important role. The purpose of this course is to present the key principles and the basic physical reasoning needed to interpret scientific and technical information and to make the best decisions. Topics include energy and power, atomic and subatomic matter, wave-like phenomena and light, and Einstein's theory of relativity.

EGR 191 / MAT 191 / PHY 191

An Integrated Introduction to Engineering, Mathematics, Physics

Professor/Instructor

Daniel Robert Marlow

Taken concurrently with EGR/MAT/PHY 192. An integrated course that covers the material of PHY 103 and MAT 201 with the emphasis on applications to engineering. Physics topics include: mechanics with applications to fluid mechanics, wave phenomena, and thermodynamics. The lab revolves around a single project to build, launch, and analyze the flight dynamics of water-propelled rockets. One lecture, three preceptorials, one three-hour laboratory.

EGR 192 / MAT 192 / PHY 192 / APC 192

An Integrated Introduction to Engineering, Mathematics, Physics

Professor/Instructor

Christine Jiayou Taylor

Taken concurrently with EGR/MAT/PHY 191. An integrated course that covers the material of PHY 103 and MAT 201 with the emphasis on applications to engineering. Math topics include: vector calculus; partial derivatives and matrices; line integrals; simple differential equations; surface and volume integrals; and Green's, Stokes's, and divergence theorems. One lecture, two preceptorials.

PHY 205

Classical Mechanics

Professor/Instructor

Classical mechanics, with emphasis on the Lagrangian method. The underlying physics is Newtonian, but with more sophisticated mathematics introduced as needed to understand more complex phenomena. Topics in this intensive course include the formalism of Lagrangian mechanics, central-force motion and scattering, rigid body motion and noninertial forces, small oscillations, coupled oscillations, and waves. Prerequisite: 103-104, or 105-106 (recommended), or permission of instructor; prior completion of MAT 201 or 203 recommended. Two 90-minute lectures.

PHY 207

Mechanics and Waves

Professor/Instructor

Covers the basics of analytical mechanics, but shifts the emphasis to wave phenomena before moving on to aspects of quantum mechanics and quantum statistical mechanics. Special relativity is given greater weight than it usually is in PHY 205. Offers students a path toward the physics concentration that is less intensive than PHY 205 and more accessible to students with less mathematical background. Prerequisites: PHY103-104, or PHY105-106; one 200-level math course; or permission of instructor. Two 90-minute lectures.

PHY 208

Principles of Quantum Mechanics

Professor/Instructor

An introduction to quantum mechanics, the physics of atoms, electrons, photons, and other elementary particles. Topics include state functions and the probability interpretation, the Schrödinger equation, the uncertainty principle, the eigenvalue problem, operators and their algebras, angular momentum and spin, perturbation theory, and the hydrogen atom. Prerequisites: PHY 106, PHY 205, or PHY 207 and MAT 203 or MAT 217, and MAT 204 or MAT 218 (MAT 204/MAT 218 can be taken concurrently); or instructor's permission. Two 90-minute lectures.

PHY 209

Computational Physics Seminar

Professor/Instructor

Introductory course in the application of computers to physics research. Two main themes are numerical analysis methods and the computer-based techniques for implementing them. Methods discussed include least-squares fitting, numerical integration, and Monte Carlo simulation. Techniques include scientific programming, spreadsheets, symbolic-manipulation programs, statistical and plotting packages, and computer graphics. Examples are drawn from various fields of physics, including elementary particle physics and astrophysics. Prerequisites: 104 or 106 or permission of instructor. One 90-minute seminar, one three-hour laboratory.

PHY 210

Experimental Physics Seminar

Professor/Instructor

This seminar introduces students to the basic techniques of electronics and instrumentation used to conduct experiments in the physical sciences. The course begins by teaching a foundation in analog and digital circuits including programmable digital logic devices using an iPad interface for data acquisition. Students develop measurement techniques in a wide range of experimental areas. Prerequisites: PHY 102, 104, 106 or 304. One three-hour seminar.

ISC 231 / CHM 231 / COS 231 / MOL 231 / PHY 231

An Integrated, Quantitative Introduction to the Natural Sciences I

Professor/Instructor

Curtis Gove Callan Jr., Joshua William Shaevitz, Peter Andolfatto

An integrated, mathematically and computationally sophisticated introduction to physics, chemistry, molecular biology, and computer science. Alternative to the combination of PHY 103-104, CHM 201-202, MOL 214-215 and COS126. Students must enroll in ISC231 and ISC232 in the fall and ISC233 and ISC234 in the spring. Prerequisites: familiarity with calculus at the level of MAT103/104 or Advanced Placement Calculus BC, solid high school physics and chemistry courses. Five lectures, one three-hour laboratory, one three-hour computational laboratory, one evening problem session.

ISC 232 / CHM 232 / COS 232 / MOL 232 / PHY 232

An Integrated, Quantitative Introduction to the Natural Sciences I

Professor/Instructor

Peter Andolfatto, Curtis Gove Callan Jr., Joshua William Shaevitz

An integrated, mathematically and computationally sophisticated introduction to physics, chemistry, molecular biology, and computer science. Alternative to the combination of PHY 103-104, CHM 201-202, MOL 214-215 and COS126. Students must enroll in ISC231 and ISC232 in the fall and ISC233 and ISC234 in the spring. Prerequisites: familiarity with the calculus at the level of MAT 103-104 or Advanced Placement Calculus BC, solid high school physics and chemistry courses. Five lectures, one three-hour laboratory, one three-hour computational laboratory, one evening problem session.

ISC 233 / CHM 233 / COS 233 / MOL 233 / PHY 233

An Integrated, Quantitative Introduction to the Natural Sciences II

Professor/Instructor

Joshua William Shaevitz, Olga G. Troyanskaya, Haw Yang

An integrated, mathematically and computationally sophisticated introduction to physics and chemistry, drawing on examples from biological systems. Alternative to the combination of PHY 103-104, CHM 201-202, MOL 214-215, and COS126. Students must enroll in ISC231 and ISC232 in the fall and ISC233 and ISC234 in the spring. Prerequisites: familiarity with the calculus at the level of MAT 103-104 or Advanced Placement Calculus BC, solid high school physics and chemistry courses. Five lectures, one three-hour laboratory, one three-hour computational laboratory, one evening problem session.

ISC 234 / CHM 234 / COS 234 / MOL 234 / PHY 234

An Integrated, Quantitative Introduction to the Natural Sciences II

Professor/Instructor

Joshua William Shaevitz, Olga G. Troyanskaya, Haw Yang

An integrated, mathematically and computationally sophisticated introduction to physics and chemistry, drawing on examples from biological systems. Alternative to the combination of PHY 103-104, CHM 201-202, MOL 214-215 and COS126. Students must enroll in ISC231 and ISC232 in the fall and ISC233 and ISC234 in the spring. Prerequisites: familiarity with the calculus at the level of MAT 103-104 or Advanced Placement Calculus BC, solid high school physics and chemistry courses. Five lectures, one three-hour laboratory, one three-hour computational laboratory, one evening problem session.

PHY 301

Thermal Physics

Professor/Instructor

A unified introduction to the physics of systems with many degrees of freedom: thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, both classical and quantum. Applications will include phase equilibrium, classical and quantum gases, and properties of solids. Three lectures. Prerequisites: Any one of PHY 106, 205, 207 or 208, or instructor's permission.

PHY 304

Advanced Electromagnetism

Professor/Instructor

Extensions of electromagnetic theory including some important applications of Maxwell's equations. Solutions to Laplace's equation--boundary value problems. Retarded potentials. Electromagnetic waves and radiation. Special relativity. Mathematical tools developed as required. Two 90-minute lectures. Prerequisites: 104 or 106.

PHY 305

Introduction to the Quantum Theory

Professor/Instructor

A second course on the basic principles of quantum mechanics with emphasis on applications to problems from atomic and solid-state physics. Two 90-minute lectures. Prerequisites: 208.

AST 309 / MAE 309 / PHY 309 / ENE 309

The Science of Nuclear Energy: Fission and Fusion

Professor/Instructor

Robert James Goldston

We develop the scientific ideas behind fission and fusion energy. For fission we move from elementary nuclear physics to calculations of chain reactions, understanding how both reactors and nuclear weapons work. We examine safety and waste concerns, as well as nuclear proliferation. We look at new reactor concepts. For fusion we address the physics of confining hot, ionized gases, called plasmas. We address the control of large-scale instabilities and small-scale turbulence. We examine progress and prospects, as well as challenges, for the development of economically attractive fusion power.

PHY 312

Experimental Physics

Professor/Instructor

The course offers six different experiments from the advanced laboratory collection. Experiments include Josephson effect, ß-decay, holography, Mössbauer spectroscopy, optical pumping. Lectures stress modern experimental methods and devices. One lecture, one laboratory.

AST 301 / PHY 321

General Relativity

Professor/Instructor

Jeremy J. Goodman

This is an introductory course in general relativity for undergraduates. Topics include the early universe, black holes, cosmic strings, worm holes, and time travel. Two 90-minute lectures. Prerequisites: MAT 201, 202; PHY 207, 208. Designed for science and engineering majors.