SLA 219 / RES 219

Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky: Introduction to the Great Russian Novel

Professor/Instructor

Michael Alex Wachtel

A survey in English of Russian literature up to 1860. The course concentrates on master prose writers of the first half of the 19th century: Pushkin, Gogol, Lermontov, the early Dostoevsky, and the early Tolstoy. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Knowledge of Russian not required.

SLA 220 / RES 220

The Great Russian Novel and Beyond: Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, and Others

Professor/Instructor

Ellen Bell Chances

A survey in English of Russian literature from mid-19th century to Soviet literature. Authors read include, among others, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Nabokov, and Bely. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Knowledge of Russian not required.

SLA 221 / RES 221

Soviet Culture, Above and Below Ground

Professor/Instructor

Katherine M.H. Reischl

A survey in English of Soviet literature from 1917 to 1965 against the background of major social and political developments. Readings include works by Zamyatin, Babel, Bulgakov, Solzhenitsyn, and other representative authors. Two lectures and preceptorial. Knowledge of Russian not required.

SOC 308 / RES 308 / EAS 308

Communism and Beyond: China and Russia

Professor/Instructor

Deborah A. Kaple

A review of the stages of communism, including reform and dismantling. Comparisons of social classes and ethnic groups under the old system and their readiness for recent changes. Treatment of workers, farmers, intellectuals, officials, and new entrepreneurs. Comparative approach to China, Russia, and other countries formed from the Soviet Union. Two ninety-minute classes.

SLA 312 / RES 312

Russian Drama

Professor/Instructor

Olga Peters Hasty

Introduction to major dramatic works of the 19th and 20th centuries, including Pushkin, Gogol, Chekhov, Shvarts, and Vampilov. Readings, discussions, oral and written reports in Russian. Two 90-minute seminars. Prerequisite: RUS 207 or instructor's permission.

SLA 316 / RES 316 / VIS 353

Ethical Dimensions of Contemporary Russian Cinema

Professor/Instructor

Exploration of the quest for moral values in Soviet and post-Soviet Russian cinema of the 1960s to the present. Topics include, among others, the effects of Stalinism; the struggle for freedom of individual conscience under totalitarianism; the artist's moral dilemmas in Soviet and post-Soviet society; materialism versus spirituality. Films of Andrei Tarkovsky, Nikita Mikhalkov, and others. One three-hour seminar. Knowledge of Russian not required.

SLA 411 / RES 411

Selected Topics in Russian Literature and Culture

Professor/Instructor

Michael Alex Wachtel

Topics include: Russian literature and the city; Russian literature and the intellectual; the search for moral value in post-Communist literature; satire; Russian literature and music; 20th-century Russian poetry, Russian emigre literature.

SLA 413 / RES 413

Pushkin and His Time

Professor/Instructor

Michael Alex Wachtel

An introduction to Pushkin's works with attention to a number of genres (lyric, long poem, drama, short story). Readings in Russian with discussions in Russian or English, depending on students' preference. Two 90-minute classes. Prerequisite: RUS 207 or instructor's permission.

SLA 415 / COM 415 / RES 415

Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace: Writing as Fighting

Professor/Instructor

Caryl Emerson

The course is primarily about War and Peace, framed by some earlier and later fiction and by Tolstoy's essays on art and religion. Tolstoy's radical ideas on narrative have a counterpart in his radical ideas on history, causation, and the formation of a moral self. Together, these concepts offer an alternative to "The Russian Idea," associated with Dostoevsky and marked by mysticism, apocalypse, and the crisis moment. To refute this idea, Tolstoy redefined the tasks of novelistic prose. Seminar.

SLA 416 / RES 416

Dostoevsky

Professor/Instructor

Ellen Bell Chances

A consideration of Dostoevsky's major works with particular emphasis upon their relation to the political, social, religious, and literary currents of his time. Knowledge of Russian not required. One three-hour seminar.