News at Princeton

Saturday, April 30, 2016
 Brian Herrera

Brian Herrera, an assistant professor of theater in the Lewis Center for the Arts, is a self-described "cultural historian" whose work, both academic and creative, examines the history of gender, sexuality and race within and through U.S. popular performance. (Photo by Denise Applewhite, Office of Communications)

 

Featured Story

Herrera bridges Latinx culture and popular performance at Princeton

Brian Herrera, an assistant professor of theater in the Lewis Center for the Arts, came to Princeton in 2012 from the University of New Mexico, where he taught world theater history and performance theory. His 2015 book, "Latin Numbers: Playing Latino in Twentieth-Century U.S. Popular Performance," has received wide acclaim, including the George Jaena Nathan Award for Dramatic Criticism.

Read Story | All Featured Stories


Other Current Stories

Author and alumnus Barron donates papers to Princeton Library

The award-winning American author and conservationist Thomas A. Barron, a 1974 Princeton alumnus and a former University trustee, has donated his literary papers to the Princeton University Library. The T. A. Barron Papers will be preserved in the Manuscripts Division, Department of Rare Books and Special Collections.

Read Story

Student winners read their 'creative reactions' to classical music in pre-concert event

The four winners of the second annual Creative Reactions Contest — an initiative of Princeton University Concerts (PUC) — do have one thing in common: they all wrote poems. Over the course of six months, the 80 Princeton students who entered the contest received a free ticket to attend one of seven PUC concerts and were asked to capture the experience of hearing live classical music. The form was flexible, allowing for blank verse, prose, poetry, narrative, even lyrics. The entries were assessed in three rounds by 12 judges, including professors, administrators and students in the arts and the humanities from the University and community.

Read Story

Wilson College to remove Woodrow Wilson photo from dining hall wall

An enlarged photograph of U.S. President Woodrow Wilson throwing out the first pitch at a baseball game will be removed from the wall of a dining hall at Wilson College, one of the residential colleges at Princeton University.

Read Story

New tool puts a consistent value on experts' uncertainty on climate change models

To bridge the gap between projections of future sea-level rise and the need to prepare for it, a Princeton University researcher and collaborators developed a method that consolidates climate models and the range of opinions that leading scientists have about them into a single, consistent set of probabilities.

Read Story

Build and play: HackPrinceton draws college participants nationwide

This spring's hackathon, held the first weekend of April, attracted about 500 participants, half students from Princeton and half from other universities. The annual event, one of a number of hackathons held at universities around the world, offered students workspace, food and advice for an intense weekend devoted to creating new devices and computer programs.

Read Story

Platt named valedictorian, Kim selected as salutatorian

Cameron Platt, an English major from Santa Barbara, California, has been selected as valedictorian of Princeton's Class of 2016. Esther Kim, an English major from Marietta, Georgia, has been named the Latin salutatorian.

Read Story

Making connections: Princeton's postdoc community

Princeton has some 600 postdocs. They are members of the academic staff whose areas of expertise span the disciplines. They come from universities across the country and around the world.

Read Story

UHS renovation will improve, temporarily relocate health services

A renovation of McCosh Health Center's first floor is planned to improve the experience of students, faculty and staff using University Health Services (UHS). Students and employees are encouraged to schedule routine medical and summer travel appointments by May 23 before work starts at the building.

Read Story

University website gets improved search capabilities

Princeton University today launched an improved search function on its primary website, www.princeton.edu. The new search mechanism delivers results that include images in addition to the headlines, texts and links that the old search mechanism delivered. The new mechanism also gives users the option to sort search results by date, with the most recent material listed first.

Read Story

Scherrer receives Hertz Fellowship for graduate study in physics

Princeton University senior and physics major Joseph Scherrer is one of 12 college seniors and first-year graduate students nationwide to be named 2016 Hertz Fellows by the Fannie and John Hertz Foundation. The fellows, who were selected from more than 800 applicants, will receive a stipend and full tuition support valued at $250,000 for up to five years of graduate study in the applied physical, biological and engineering sciences. Scherrer, from Nashville, Tennessee, will begin pursuing a Ph.D. in physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2017.

Read Story

Students collaborate around issues of social justice in freshman seminar

Tackling complex topics and exploring solutions as a group is a key feature of "Capitalism, Utopia and Social Justice," the Freshman Seminar in Human Values being offered this semester. It is taught by Marc Fleurbaey, the Robert E. Kuenne Professor in Economics and Humanistic Studies and a professor of public affairs and the University Center for Human Values.

Read Story

Board approves two faculty appointments

The Princeton University Board of Trustees has approved the appointments of two faculty members.

Read Story

Mortality rates improve among kids and young adults in the U.S., especially in poor counties

Recent studies of mortality trends paint a gloomy picture for many middle-aged and older Americans, but a new study focused on children reveals a more optimistic future.

Read Story

Gene behind 'evolution in action' in Darwin's finches identified

Scientists from Princeton University and Uppsala University have identified a specific gene that within a year helped spur a permanent physical change in a finch species in response to a drought-induced food shortage. The findings provide a genetic basis for natural selection that, when combined with observational data, could serve as a comprehensive model of evolution.

Read Story

Princeton juniors Payton, Teehan awarded Truman Scholarship for public service

Princeton University juniors Briana Payton and Daniel Teehan have been awarded 2016 Truman Scholarships, which provide up to $30,000 toward graduate school and the opportunity to participate in professional development programs to prepare for careers in public service.

Read Story

Tighter enforcement along the U.S.-Mexico border backfired, researchers find

The rapid escalation of border enforcement over the past three decades has backfired as a strategy to control undocumented immigration between Mexico and the United States, according to new research that suggests further militarization of the border is a waste of money.

Read Story

Dean for Research Innovation Funds enable bold and creative new projects

Eight new research projects, from novel ways to control mosquitoes to a telescope for studying the Big Bang, have been awarded funding through the Dean for Research Innovation Funds at Princeton University. These competitive awards aim to encourage bold explorations in natural sciences, the humanities, industrial research collaborations and the campus as a laboratory.

Read Story

Dale winner Gong to serve homeless and tell their stories

Princeton University senior Lisa Gong has been awarded the 2016 Martin Dale Fellowship,  a $33,000 grant for a senior to spend the year after graduation on "an independent project of extraordinary merit that will widen the recipient's experience of the world and significantly enhance the recipient's growth and intellectual development."

Read Story

Ocean currents push phytoplankton — and pollution — around the globe faster than thought

Princeton University researchers found that ocean currents can carry objects to almost any place on the globe in less than a decade, faster than previously thought. While good for microorganisms such as phytoplankton that are essential to the marine food web, it also means that plastic debris, radioactive particles and virtually any kind of litter can quickly become a problem in areas far from where they originated.

Read Story

Communiversity brings together town, University

Communiversity, an annual celebration that brings Princeton University and the town of Princeton together for a day of performances, food, games and fun, drew tens of thousands on Sunday, April 17.

Read Story

Anne Jarvis to become Princeton University librarian

Anne Jarvis, who has been university librarian at the University of Cambridge since 2009, will become the University librarian at Princeton effective Oct. 1.

"Anne Jarvis is one of the world's premier librarians," Princeton University President Chri...

Read Story

Trees' internal water pipes predict which species survive drought

A team including Princeton University researchers has found that tree species that can withstand stress to the water-transport system that carries water from the roots to the crown are less susceptible to drought and massive die-off. The findings could help forestry experts, especially in the American West, create early-warning systems and take precautionary steps to reduce a forest's vulnerability to drought.

Read Story

Alumni celebrate 100 years of Jewish life at Princeton

A century after small Friday night dinners marked the earliest expressions of Jewish life on campus, Princeton University alumni spanning eight decades returned to campus for a three-day conference, " L'Chaim! To Life: Celebrating 100 Years of Jewish Life at Princeton."

Read Story

Researchers discover new steps in the escalating cat-and-mouse game of internet censorship

Researchers have found that the "Great Firewall" technology that controls internet traffic entering and leaving China is not merely an apparatus that statically blocks traffic. It also actively sends probes to other machines that are connected to the internet, preemptively searching for internet infrastructure and services that seek to circumvent its defenses.

Read Story

Princeton graduate student creates computer program to help stabilize fusion plasmas

A Princeton University graduate student has worked with physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory to develop a method for limiting instabilities that reduce the performance of fusion plasmas. The more instabilities there are, the less efficiently the doughnut-shaped fusion facilities called tokamaks operate.

Read Story

Junior Etskovitz awarded Beinecke Scholarship for postgraduate study in English literature

Princeton junior Joani Etskovitz has been awarded a Beinecke Scholarship, which supports promising students in their graduate studies in the arts, humanities and social sciences.

Read Story

Exhibition examines contested legacy of Woodrow Wilson

The contested legacy of Woodrow Wilson forms the focus of an exhibition now on display in the Bernstein Gallery of Robertson Hall.

Read Story

Tidal forces explain how an icy moon of Saturn keeps its 'tiger stripes'

Researchers from Princeton University and the University of Chicago show that the mysterious persistence of the massive fissures known as "tiger stripes" on the surface of Saturn's sixth-largest moon, Enceladus, could be sustained by the sloshing of water in the vast ocean beneath the moon's thick ice shell. The findings could help provide a clear objective for future satellite missions to the Enceladus, which scientists suspect could host life.

Read Story

What I think: Amaney Jamal

Amaney Jamal, the Edwards S. Sanford Professor of Politics and director of the Mamdouha S. Bobst Center for Peace and Justice, has taught at Princeton since 2003. Jamal was born in Oakland, California, and lived in Modesto, California, as a child. At age 10, her parents decided the family should move to Ramallah, in the Israeli-occupied West Bank, to learn more about their culture and their religion, Islam. Jamal returned to the United States for college. She earned her undergraduate degree from the University of California-Los Angeles and her Ph.D. from the University of Michigan. She taught at Columbia University before arriving at Princeton. Her most recent book, "Of Empires and Citizens: Pro-American Democracy or No Democracy at All," was published in 2012. She teaches on topics including politics of the Middle East, democracy in the Middle East, gender and Islam, and comparative politics. She is also principal investigator for the Arab Barometer project, which measures public opinion in the Arab world.

Read Story

Three Princeton students named Goldwater Scholars for STEM study

Princeton sophomore Sara Fridovich-Keil and juniors Siddhartha Jayanti and Peter Park have been awarded Goldwater Scholarships, the premier award for outstanding undergraduates interested in careers in mathematics, the natural sciences and engineering.

Read Story

Princeton to discontinue sprint football program

Princeton University has decided to discontinue its sprint football program, effective this spring. Princeton is one of only three Ivy League schools that offer the program, and sprint football is the University's only varsity team (out of 38) that plays in a league that is not associated either with the Ivy League or with the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA).

Read Story

Princeton to temporarily house Geniza Collection of ancient Hebrew and Arabic documents

The Jewish Theological Seminary of America's renowned Geniza Collection will be housed temporarily in the Princeton University Library while JTS, located in New York City, rebuilds its library. The Geniza Collection represents a substantial portion of some 300,000 items "discovered" in the late 19th century in the Cairo Geniza (a Hebrew word meaning "storeroom") of the Ben Ezra Synagogue in the old city of Cairo (Al-Fusṭāṭ). The Cairo Geniza fragments — which span more than a millennium — were consigned to the storeroom because damaged or worn-out religious texts and unneeded old documents could not be thrown away if they contained the name of God.

Read Story

John C. Moore, dedicated and influential Princeton mathematician, dies

Princeton University professor emeritus John C. Moore, described as a committed and influential mathematician, died Jan. 1 in Rochester, New York. He was 92. Moore specialized in algebraic topology and had many important concepts named after him.

Read Story

Discovery and community: Graduate students share their experiences

Discovery. Community. Diversity. Leadership. These are some of the values that guide graduate education at Princeton University. About 2,600 students are enrolled in master's and doctoral programs at Princeton, studying closely with faculty in 42 academic departments and programs. Each of these students experiences campus differently, and, here, five students share their impressions of Princeton.

Read Story

Dillon Gymnasium pool, locker rooms to close for renovations

A renovation project underway at Dillon Gymnasium is designed to improve the experience of students, faculty and staff who use the facility.

Read Story

Princeton's annual financial aid budget grows 6.6 percent to $147.4 million

Princeton University’s trustees have adopted the University’s operating budget for 2016-17, which includes a 6.6 percent increase to $147.4 million in the undergraduate financial aid budget to continue to ensure that a Princeton education is genuinely affordable for every admitted student.  

Read Story

LaTanya Buck named dean for diversity and inclusion

LaTanya Buck, founding director of the Center for Diversity and Inclusion at Washington University in St. Louis, will join Princeton University in August as dean for diversity and inclusion.

Read Story

Expanded University bike-share program enhances 'bike culture' for campus and town

Princeton University has built on its commitment of providing sustainable and convenient transportation options for faculty, staff, students and the community by expanding its bike-share program to include a total of 70 bikes available at eight locations around main campus and one on the Forrestal Campus.

Read Story

Emily Carter named dean of engineering school at Princeton

Emily A. Carter, a Princeton faculty member since 2004 and founding director of the University's Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, has been selected as the next dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science. Her appointment is effective July 1.

Read Story

Trustees call for expanded commitment to diversity and inclusion

The Princeton University Board of Trustees has called for an expanded and more vigorous commitment to diversity and inclusion at Princeton, with concerted efforts not only to implement a broad range of existing initiatives, but to take additional actions, including those proposed by a special trustee committee that was appointed last fall to consider the legacy of Woodrow Wilson at Princeton. 

Read Story

Princeton offers admission to 6.46 percent of Class of 2020 applicants

Princeton University has offered admission to 1,894 students, or 6.46 percent of the 29,303 applicants for the Class of 2020, in what is the University’s most selective admission process to date. Last year, the University's admission rate was 6.99 percent. The class size is expected to be 1,308 students for the Class of 2020.

Read Story

Princeton responds to Congressional letter on endowments

Princeton University has responded to a letter from the Senate Committee on Finance and the House Committee on Ways and Means by describing the ways in which the University uses its endowment to carry out its charitable and educational purposes.

Read Story

Meaningful service: Pace Center for Civic Engagement celebrates 15 years

Fifteen years ago, Princeton University created a center focused on supporting student service and civic engagement. Today, the Pace Center for Civic Engagement is thriving, helping Princeton students learn how to do service well and have a positive impact in the community.

Read Story

Partnerships yield global impact for Engineers Without Borders

When Josh Umansky-Castro joined Engineers Without Borders as a freshman, he traveled to the remote mountain town of La Pitajaya, Peru, to help build and maintain two water distribution systems serving 21 families.

Read Story

FACULTY HONOR: Draine, Turner join board of Breakthrough Starshot

Princeton University professors of astrophysical sciences Bruce Draine and Edwin Turner have been named to the management and advisory committee of Breakthrough Starshot, a new $100 million endeavor to develop a proof-of-concept for unmanned nanocrafts capable of deep-space travel at speeds nearing that of light.

Read Story

FACULTY HONOR: Seven named to American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Seven Princeton faculty members have been named fellows of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. They are among leaders in scholarship, business, the arts and public affairs elected this year in recognition of their contributions to their respective fields.

Read Story

FACULTY AWARD: Rexford honored for work on 'glue that binds the internet'

Jennifer Rexford, chair of the Department of Computer Science, has been named the 2016-17 Athena Lecturer by the Association for Computing Machinery, the largest professional society in computing research and education. The award recognizes female researchers who have made fundamental contributions to computer science. Rexford, the Gordon Y.S. Wu Professor of Engineering, is a leader in computer networking. Her research has focused on methods to improve and expand digital communications. Among other areas, she has contributed to advances in the Border Gateway Protocols (BGP), which enables communications across the many networks that form the internet. She has also helped establish methods to improve the design and control of networks at multiple levels.

Read Story

FACULTY HONOR: James named International Monetary Fund historian

Harold James, the Claude and Lore Kelly Professor in European Studies, professor of history and international affairs, and director of the Program in Contemporary European Politics and Society, has been selected as one of the two new historians at the International Monetary Fund (IMF). He and Atish (Rex) Ghosh from the IMF will begin their new roles May 2. James will retain his normal roles at Princeton. Ghosh was an assistant professor of economics and international affairs from 1989 to 1996.

Read Story

FACULTY HONOR: Kang named Komen Scholar for breast cancer research

Yibin Kang, Princeton University's Warner-Lambert/Parke-Davis Professor of Molecular Biology, is among 16 researchers to be named Komen Scholars by Susan G. Komen, the world's leading breast cancer organization. Komen Scholars are chosen for their knowledge and leadership within the scientific, research and advocacy communities, and for their own contributions to breast cancer research.

Read Story

AWARD: Four win Guggenheim Fellowships

Two Princeton faculty members and one visiting lecturer have received 2016 Guggenheim Fellowships: Daniel Garber, the Stuart Professor of Philosophy, for "How Philosophy Became Modern in the 17th Century"; Juri Seo, assistant professor of music, for music composition; Raphael Xavier, visiting lecturer in dance and the Lewis Center for the Arts, for choreography; and Robert Spoo, who received his Ph.D. in English in 1986.

Read Story